MLK - thanks for the dream

Oct 2010
66,069
26,486
Colorado
#1
"I have a dream" was preached on August 28, 1963. Though only 14 at the time, I remember how it moved me. Less than three months later, JFK was assassinated. I remember crying myself to sleep that night.

By 1968, near the close of my freshman year of college, I'd "made it back," from that day in 1963. On April 4, 1968, Rev. King was assassinated. Later that year, on June 5, 1968, RFK was assassinated.

A part of me, and a part of my country died along with these men. They were not perfect, not saints, but they were inspiring, and between them, I do have a set of ideals they inspired. I'll not live to see my ideals become real. Ideals are never reached, which is why they are ideals.

But because of you, Bobby, Martin, and John, I do have a dream. Thank you.

 
Dec 2015
15,045
13,916
Arizona
#2
I was pretty young when MLK was actively speaking and traveling. It's only been in the last few years that I've read more about him and researched his speeches and quotes. They are really QUITE astonishing--filled with wisdom and inspiration. Now I'm wondering if King wrote his own speeches or had a writer. Does anyone know?

Some of my favorite quotes:

There comes a time when silence is betrayal.

In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.

That old law about 'an eye for an eye' leaves everybody blind. The time is always right to do the right thing.

People fail to get along because they fear each other; they fear each other because they don't know each other; they don't know each other because they have not communicated with each other.

Our pastor preached on this yesterday--about FEAR. What are we afraid of? Are we justified in that fear? Facing our fear of crime, terrorism and politics.
 
May 2018
2,841
1,994
USA
#3
Pretty nice testimonials from imaginethat and clara. I have a different sort of story to tell. I'm only 53 and was only 3 when he was assassinated, so I can't regale experiences like clara/imaginethat, however my father told me a very depressing story.

My dad worked for Texas Oil. He was an oilfield tester (aka: the guy who would tell oil companies where they should build refineries and such). Anyway Dad spent 90% of his time on the road and very little time in the office. He said the day MLK was assassinated that he was in the home office in Midland, Texas when the news was announced over the radio that MLK was killed. Dad said nearly everybody in the room STOOD UP AND CHEERED. Think about that for a minute. Dad didn't, of course, because he has something called "moral values" (it's why my family aren't Republicans), but those other white oil men did. How sickening is that? Those "Christian" men CHEERING that a man dedicated to fairness and improving people's lives was murdered. Reminds me of the fake RW "Christians" of today, actually.
 
Nov 2018
3,132
1,462
Inner Space
#4
The most important lesson and least appreciated is to consider the response that most of the population had to his messages at the time: That he was an "outside agitator", that "he was too impatient, change would come eventually", that "he did not understand traditional Southern culture", that "he was a communist opportunist".... Hoover investigated him, considered him a threat to national security, and believed MLK was controlled by communist interests.

I find it ironic that current conservatives (primarily Republicans) embrace him now but that same political mindset would have considered him a threat who incited violence (by police, of course).
 
May 2018
2,841
1,994
USA
#5
The most important lesson and least appreciated is to consider the response that most of the population had to his messages at the time: That he was an "outside agitator", that "he was too impatient, change would come eventually", that "he did not understand traditional Southern culture", that "he was a communist opportunist".... Hoover investigated him, considered him a threat to national security, and believed MLK was controlled by communist interests.

I find it ironic that current conservatives (primarily Republicans) embrace him now but that same political mindset would have considered him a threat who incited violence (by police, of course).
Republicans despise MLK. They hide their contempt for him, of course. Most Americans revile racism, but there's a 30-35% that is profoundly racist. That 30-35% are Republicans, straight up. However since the majority despise racists, the Republicans pretend to admire MLK. But their contempt of him pours out of them like a sieve and is apparent in their contempt of minorities, poor people, sick people, etc.

Remember how Republican dominated Arizona refused to recognize MLK day for years?
 
Nov 2018
3,132
1,462
Inner Space
#6
Pretty nice testimonials from imaginethat and clara. I have a different sort of story to tell. I'm only 53 and was only 3 when he was assassinated, so I can't regale experiences like clara/imaginethat, however my father told me a very depressing story.

My dad worked for Texas Oil. He was an oilfield tester (aka: the guy who would tell oil companies where they should build refineries and such). Anyway Dad spent 90% of his time on the road and very little time in the office. He said the day MLK was assassinated that he was in the home office in Midland, Texas when the news was announced over the radio that MLK was killed. Dad said nearly everybody in the room STOOD UP AND CHEERED. Think about that for a minute. Dad didn't, of course, because he has something called "moral values" (it's why my family aren't Republicans), but those other white oil men did. How sickening is that? Those "Christian" men CHEERING that a man dedicated to fairness and improving people's lives was murdered. Reminds me of the fake RW "Christians" of today, actually.
I think this day should be renamed "A Day of Conservative Reflection, Apology, and Contrition" for the hatred and resistance to change so prevalent around civil rights protests historically that seems to have been forgotten...as white Southern Democrats became reactionary Republicans.
 
Nov 2018
3,132
1,462
Inner Space
#7
Republicans despise MLK. They hide their contempt for him, of course. Most Americans revile racism, but there's a 30-35% that is profoundly racist. That 30-35% are Republicans, straight up. However since the majority despise racists, the Republicans pretend to admire MLK. But their contempt of him pours out of them like a sieve and is apparent in their contempt of minorities, poor people, sick people, etc.

Remember how Republican dominated Arizona refused to recognize MLK day for years?
It is still, to some extent, a federal holiday seen as inappropriate or undeserved by many who just grumble quietly about that "philandering Negro". MLK probably prevented a major race war in the late 60's that could have involved SNIC, Black Panthers, Black Muslims, Free Puerto Rico, and similar groups.
 
May 2018
2,841
1,994
USA
#8
I think this day should be renamed "A Day of Conservative Reflection, Apology, and Contrition" for the hatred and resistance to change so prevalent around civil rights protests historically that seems to have been forgotten...as white Southern Democrats became reactionary Republicans.
Good point. It amazes me how many of today "staunch" southern Republicans deny that the 1964 Civil Rights Act is what turned the South red. The GOP lock on the Deep South is due 100% to endemic racism, nothing more.
 
Likes: imaginethat
Dec 2015
15,045
13,916
Arizona
#9
Republicans despise MLK. They hide their contempt for him, of course. Most Americans revile racism, but there's a 30-35% that is profoundly racist. That 30-35% are Republicans, straight up. However since the majority despise racists, the Republicans pretend to admire MLK. But their contempt of him pours out of them like a sieve and is apparent in their contempt of minorities, poor people, sick people, etc.

Remember how Republican dominated Arizona refused to recognize MLK day for years?

Lip Service. GOP Lip Service and OHHH....how they fought to disrespect King. Apparently we've been mislead to believe that King was a "great" man. He was an agitating Commie, you know. He encouraged violence in the streets. He didn't know his PLACE. How about a statue somewhere (in back of the outhouse) instead of a national holiday? Consider our fiscal responsibility when discussing a HOLIDAY. Why should King be elevated above our more distinguished (white) leaders? If we create a national holiday for KING, we'll have to do it for everyone! The detractors sited specific black people who had criticized King. It's racist, you know, to reserve a holiday for Black Americans....and then what about our Native Americans??
AND what about Chinese Americans? Blah blah

Lip Service. Yes Yes---the murder was a great tragedy but.........
 

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