Morality of abortion

Nov 2018
4,894
2,596
Rocky Mountains
Let's consider a hypothetical situation:

Science advances to the point that men can become pregnant However, it turns out to be an unanticipated side effect of a drug to increase male fertility and produces an intraabdominal clone of the male himself that is viable. By a surgery equivalent to c-section that clone could be removed and produce a viable human.
Would the male under this circumstance, have the right to get that unwanted clone removed or be required to carry that "pregnancy" to term?
That's an absurd hypothetical. Even so, if people ever perfect cloning, I would not condone the killing of clones. Would you?
Maybe not so unlikely. There are abdominal pregnancies in women and the physiology is entirely possible with hormonal manipulation. The cloning is problematic. May seem like science fiction now, but it is within reach, I believe, within the next 30 years easily.

I would support the man's right to primary control over events within his body.....body integrity is the most basic of all human rights.
 
Dec 2018
1,999
1,197
Unionville Indiana
A miscarriage in a home won't appear to be an in patient abortion procedure in a facility.
But if an infant died in the home, the authorities would investigate if foul play was suspected. Abortions can happen in private residences too.
 
May 2019
116
8
US
I would support the man's right to primary control over events within his body.....body integrity is the most basic of all human rights.
I basically agree. The issue is the question of when that right begins, and why a given starting point is chosen. That's what we have been arguing about. I know it's been a long thread, so you may not remember, but I haven't exactly been arguing for a given starting point. I have been challenging whatever starting point you or others present. It's an important issue, especially if you care about rights. And the answer isn't actually as easy as people wish. Most pro-choicers are against elective later term abortions, but they are unwilling to discuss the point at which they are for them. Many won't even discuss later abortions because they are such a small percentage of abortions, 1.3%, which ignores the large raw number of about 50,000.
I don't expect to change anyone's mind on the matter, so we don't really need to continue. But I hope you can see that your opposition isn't necessarily reliant on religious superstition. There's actually a lot more to the matter than a simple "God said so" or "It's none of my business".
 
May 2019
116
8
US
But if an infant died in the home, the authorities would investigate if foul play was suspected. Abortions can happen in private residences too.
Yes, authorities investigate dead infants when foul play is suspected. Evidence of a medical abortion might raise reasonable suspicions. Evidence of a miscarriage wouldn't. In either case, what would prompt the authorities to respond to the scene?
Should authorities investigate neonaticide?
 
Dec 2018
1,999
1,197
Unionville Indiana
Yes, authorities investigate dead infants when foul play is suspected. Evidence of a medical abortion might raise reasonable suspicions. Evidence of a miscarriage wouldn't. In either case, what would prompt the authorities to respond to the scene?
Should authorities investigate neonaticide?
Aren't you the one who believes in equal protection, under law, for zygotes, embryos and fetuses?
 
May 2019
116
8
US
Aren't you the one who believes in equal protection, under law, for zygotes, embryos and fetuses?
I'm the one who made a Constitutional argument for overturning Roe and Griswold based on the 14th Amendment and replacing Griswold based on the 10th. No one was able to counter my position, which said nothing about zygotes or embryos.
 
May 2019
116
8
US
Aren't you the one who believes in equal protection, under law, for zygotes, embryos and fetuses?
Now try to stay on track.
In either case, what would prompt the authorities to respond to the scene?
Should authorities investigate neonaticide?