More on AGW

Oct 2010
66,921
26,991
Colorado
#2
The hardiness map from your second link shows exactly what I've witnessed living in this high mountain valley for almost four decades.

Our growing season is around 3-4 weeks longer. Insects and birds that formerly didn't live here at all now are fairly common. Temps in the -30s have gone from 1-2 week long events to occasional occurrences. The ol' -40 mornings are gone, not that I'm complaining.

The reservoir just to the west of town is ridiculously low.



Sun & climate: moving in opposite directions
 
Nov 2012
40,545
11,692
Lebanon, TN
#3
solar activity increased the earth became warmer the solar Activity since 1998 has plateaued and so did warming.

Wow. Just what I have been saying. Notice the climate model posted by RNG, did not match reatlity

 
Jul 2008
18,537
12,264
Virginia Beach, VA
#5
solar activity increased the earth became warmer the solar Activity since 1998 has plateaued and so did warming.

Wow. Just what I have been saying. Notice the climate model posted by RNG, did not match reatlity

TN being TN

TN finds something that confirms his conclusion and runs with it without doing any research on it.

Just a bit of research shows that his information, as usual, is wrong.

Monckton, RSS, and no warming since September 1996
 
Nov 2017
1,918
930
.
#6
Why is it scary? This is normal for the planet. Things change, and we don't always know or have the correct answer for what causes things to happen.

Ever since I moved here to Northern Virginia over 30 years ago, very close to the Potomac River, I have never noticed the tiniest change in the landscape. Supposedly I should have, according to some. I asked someone who runs chartered boat tours up and down along the Potomac River, who has been very familiar with the areas of the Potomac River where he provides tours for several decades (since he was a child), whether or not he has ever noticed any change at all in the river's water level; he said he hasn't.

The Potomac River connects to the Chesapeake Bay, and the Chesapeake Bay connects to the Atlantic Ocean. Seems to me it stands to reason that a rise in the Atlantic Ocean sea level ought to cause the Chesapeake Bay water level to rise, which would in turn cause the Potomac River water level to rise. If sea levels are rising, why doesn't it seem to me that the Potomac River water level has risen, especially if it should've been noticeable?
 
Likes: Sabcat
Jul 2008
18,537
12,264
Virginia Beach, VA
#7
Why is it scary? This is normal for the planet. Things change, and we don't always know or have the correct answer for what causes things to happen.

Ever since I moved here to Northern Virginia over 30 years ago, very close to the Potomac River, I have never noticed the tiniest change in the landscape. Supposedly I should have, according to some. I asked someone who runs chartered boat tours up and down along the Potomac River, who has been very familiar with the areas of the Potomac River where he provides tours for several decades (since he was a child), whether or not he has ever noticed any change at all in the river's water level; he said he hasn't.

The Potomac River connects to the Chesapeake Bay, and the Chesapeake Bay connects to the Atlantic Ocean. Seems to me it stands to reason that a rise in the Atlantic Ocean sea level ought to cause the Chesapeake Bay water level to rise, which would in turn cause the Potomac River water level to rise. If sea levels are rising, why doesn't it seem to me that the Potomac River water level has risen, especially if it should've been noticeable?
It’s not that simple. Topography plays a large part in what changes (if any) you might see. Take the extreme example of a waterfall. A rise in water levels at the bottom of the falls is not going to impact the water levels at the top. It’s obvious that any “backup” is not going to go “up the waterfall” to affect the river at the top. If you lower the extreme gradient from waterfall to just a slight gradient the same concept applies. If point 3 miles from the mouth of a river is 150 feet above sea level but the mouth of the river is at sea level any rise in sea level is not going affect that point 3 miles inland. What will happen instead is that the water at the mouth of the river will spread out.
 
Likes: imaginethat
Nov 2017
1,918
930
.
#8
It’s not that simple. Topography plays a large part in what changes (if any) you might see. Take the extreme example of a waterfall. A rise in water levels at the bottom of the falls is not going to impact the water levels at the top. It’s obvious that any “backup” is not going to go “up the waterfall” to affect the river at the top. If you lower the extreme gradient from waterfall to just a slight gradient the same concept applies. If point 3 miles from the mouth of a river is 150 feet above sea level but the mouth of the river is at sea level any rise in sea level is not going affect that point 3 miles inland. What will happen instead is that the water at the mouth of the river will spread out.
Yes, but I'm not talking about this part of the Potomac River, which fits your description:


That's what it's like to the north of DC; I'm talking about these parts of the Potomac River (that general body of water with the same water level shown in these 2 video clips), which is to the south of DC:


 
Jul 2008
18,537
12,264
Virginia Beach, VA
#9
How high above sea level are the latter two videos. If it is higher then where the Potomac empties into the Chesapeake Bay then you will not see an effect from sea (or bay) level rise.
 
Likes: imaginethat

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