Nike: Betsy Ross Flag vs the Stars and Bars . . . Confederate flag wins?

Sep 2017
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#41
More than likely the South would have abandoned slavery sooner or later....But what I was wondering would they have looked at the Stars and Bars and the Flag of Northern Virginia as symbols of hate.....Would they be tearing down statues of Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson.....or would they still be revered as the Founding Fathers??
Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson WERE NOT Founding Fathers, although the modern SJW's tend to overlook that they both were anti-slavery in their time and world.
 
Sep 2017
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#43
Lee had a black brother that he took care of. Jackson was a slave owner.
Right. Disregard the times and places at will to make a point that only those ignorant in history will approve your post. Your historical perspective is pure BS as demonstrated by you foolish post alluring to imaginary knowledge and faulty reading in Military, and in history, as always....

Wiki:

Slavery[edit]

Stonewall Jackson in 1855
Little as he was known to the white inhabitants of Lexington, Jackson was revered by many of the African Americans in town, both slaves and free blacks. In 1855, he was instrumental in the organization of Sunday School classes for blacks at the Presbyterian Church. His second wife, Mary Anna Jackson, taught with Jackson, as "he preferred that my labors should be given to the colored children, believing that it was more important and useful to put the strong hand of the Gospel under the ignorant African race, to lift them up."[27] The pastor, Dr. William Spottswood White, described the relationship between Jackson and his Sunday afternoon students: "In their religious instruction he succeeded wonderfully. His discipline was systematic and firm, but very kind. ... His servants reverenced and loved him, as they would have done a brother or father. ... He was emphatically the black man's friend." He addressed his students by name and they, in turn, referred to him affectionately as "Marse Major".[28]
Jackson's family owned six slaves in the late 1850s. Three (Hetty, Cyrus, and George, a mother and two teenage sons) were received as a wedding present. Another, Albert, requested that Jackson purchase him and allow him to work for his freedom; he was employed as a waiter in one of the Lexington hotels and Jackson rented him to VMI. Amy also requested that Jackson purchase her from a public slave auction and she served the family as a cook and housekeeper. The sixth, Emma, was a four-year-old orphan with a learning disability, accepted by Jackson from an aged widow and presented to his second wife, Mary Anna, as a welcome-home gift.[29] After the American Civil War began he appears to have hired out or sold his slaves, except, apparently at least, one slave: "A 'servant', Jim Lewis, had stayed with Jackson in the small house as he lay dying".[30] Mary Anna Jackson, in her 1895 memoir, said, "our servants ... without the firm guidance and restraint of their master, the excitement of the times proved so demoralizing to them that he deemed it best for me to provide them with good homes among the permanent residents."[31] James Robertson wrote about Jackson's view on slavery:
Jackson neither apologized for nor spoke in favor of the practice of slavery. He probably opposed the institution. Yet in his mind the Creator had sanctioned slavery, and man had no moral right to challenge its existence. The good Christian slaveholder was one who treated his servants fairly and humanely at all times.[32]
 
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Jul 2018
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492
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#44
Right. Your BS in due to imaginary knowledge and faulty reading in Military, and in history, as always.

Slavery[edit]

Stonewall Jackson in 1855
Little as he was known to the white inhabitants of Lexington, Jackson was revered by many of the African Americans in town, both slaves and free blacks. In 1855, he was instrumental in the organization of Sunday School classes for blacks at the Presbyterian Church. His second wife, Mary Anna Jackson, taught with Jackson, as "he preferred that my labors should be given to the colored children, believing that it was more important and useful to put the strong hand of the Gospel under the ignorant African race, to lift them up."[27] The pastor, Dr. William Spottswood White, described the relationship between Jackson and his Sunday afternoon students: "In their religious instruction he succeeded wonderfully. His discipline was systematic and firm, but very kind. ... His servants reverenced and loved him, as they would have done a brother or father. ... He was emphatically the black man's friend." He addressed his students by name and they, in turn, referred to him affectionately as "Marse Major".[28]
Jackson's family owned six slaves in the late 1850s. Three (Hetty, Cyrus, and George, a mother and two teenage sons) were received as a wedding present. Another, Albert, requested that Jackson purchase him and allow him to work for his freedom; he was employed as a waiter in one of the Lexington hotels and Jackson rented him to VMI. Amy also requested that Jackson purchase her from a public slave auction and she served the family as a cook and housekeeper. The sixth, Emma, was a four-year-old orphan with a learning disability, accepted by Jackson from an aged widow and presented to his second wife, Mary Anna, as a welcome-home gift.[29] After the American Civil War began he appears to have hired out or sold his slaves, except, apparently at least, one slave: "A 'servant', Jim Lewis, had stayed with Jackson in the small house as he lay dying".[30] Mary Anna Jackson, in her 1895 memoir, said, "our servants ... without the firm guidance and restraint of their master, the excitement of the times proved so demoralizing to them that he deemed it best for me to provide them with good homes among the permanent residents."[31] James Robertson wrote about Jackson's view on slavery:
Jackson neither apologized for nor spoke in favor of the practice of slavery. He probably opposed the institution. Yet in his mind the Creator had sanctioned slavery, and man had no moral right to challenge its existence. The good Christian slaveholder was one who treated his servants fairly and humanely at all times.[32]
You just proved by your own evidence that Jackson was a slaver. I suggest that if you ever go to court that you don't act as your own lawyer.

I'll bet that Jackson told the slaves to obey their masters in all things, just like the Bible says.
 
Sep 2017
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#45
You just proved by your own evidence that Jackson was a slaver. I suggest that if you ever go to court that you don't act as your own lawyer.

I'll bet that Jackson told the slaves to obey their masters in all things, just like the Bible says.
Only fools cannot separate a cracker from a someone trying to find a way out. You act like a man well stupid beyond any Bible.
 
Jul 2018
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#46
Only fools cannot separate a cracker from a someone trying to find a way out. You act like a man well stupid beyond any Bible.
If you misspoke in your previous post you should have simply said that your information was wrong. It's one thing to debate opinions but it is foolish to argue about easily verifiable historical facts. Stonewall Jackson was a slaver. That is a historical fact. He only owned several but that made him a slaver. It seemed that he fed them a line of biblical bull shit so that they would be docile slaves instead of angry ones.
 
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