Off-duty officer entered wrong apartment, shot and killed resident

Dec 2015
12,898
11,829
Arizona
#73
Lawyers call police officer's story in wrong-apartment shooting 'highly implausible'

The arrest warrant affidavit for a Dallas police officer who shot a man after she says she mistakenly entered his apartment has prompted more questions than answers for the victim's family, whose lawyers called the officer's scenario "highly implausible."

"Independent witnesses have already come forward to say that they heard this officer pounding on the door and demanding to be let in," Lee Merritt, one of the attorneys representing the Jean family, told ABC News. "The contradictions begin to build from there."

President of the Dallas Police Association said this: "you can understand how a mistake can be made."

OMG!!!
 
Dec 2015
12,898
11,829
Arizona
#74
He ignored verbal commands?
WOW
Inside his own apartment - his own locked apartment - he didn't respond to verbal commands from somebody trying to break in?
AMAZING
This whole verbal command thing has been haunting me. What are our rights? Must we comply? I found an article written 4 years ago which gave me some insight and it's not a pretty picture. See what you think.

Should we just follow orders? John Whitehead
The perils of resisting the police state grow more costly with each passing day, especially if you hope to escape with your life and property intact. The thing you must remember is that we’ve entered an age of militarized police in which we’re no longer viewed as civilians but as enemy combatants.

Indeed, anything short of compliance will now get you charged with any of the growing number of contempt charges (ranging from resisting arrest and interference to disorderly conduct, obstruction, and failure to obey a police order) that get trotted out anytime a citizen voices discontent with the government or challenges or even questions the authority of the powers that be—and that’s the best case scenario. The worst-case scenario involves getting probed, poked, pinched, tasered, tackled, searched, seized, stripped, manhandled, arrested, shot, or killed.

So what can you really do when you find yourself at the mercy of law enforcement officers who have almost absolute discretion to decide who is a threat, what constitutes resistance, and how harshly they can deal with the citizens they were appointed to “serve and protect”? In other words, what are the rules of engagement when it comes to interacting with the police?

If you want to play it safe, comply and do whatever a police officer tells you to do. Don’t talk back. Don’t threaten. And don’t walk away. In other words, don’t do anything that even hints at resistance.

Keep in mind, however, that this is not a fail-safe plan, especially not in an age where police officers tend to shoot first and ask questions later, oftentimes based only on their highly subjective “feeling” of being threatened.

The article goes on and it's frightening: Should We Just Follow Orders? Rules of Engagement for Resisting the Police State | HuffPost

I was raised to respect police officers. I was raised to believe that police are our friends and some are or at least have been. My neighbor's sister just retired from 27 years on the Chicago police dept--SOUTH SIDE. We just got together last week and she's great---tough as nails--but great....but she would throw this little old lady on the ground in a heartbeat if I didn't comply...because that's the world we live in now. Guilty until proven innocent and if you die in the process--oh well--casualties of war.
 
Nov 2017
1,243
695
Virginia
#75
Here's a video on YouTube with a segment claiming to show how the doors and keys work in the apartment, starting here (unfortunately I don't know where or how to find the original source, I'd prefer to simply show just that part):


A little bit of skepticism is due, because anyone can show a bunch of doors in any apartment building and claim it's the same one; this man and woman don't identify themselves or anything. Anyways, for now I'm not really doubting that it is the same building, because if someone were to fake such a thing it's too easy to get caught because someone (else) who does live there can show that it's different.

I guess another thing I find odd is that for the doors to work this way they have to be provided with power; if the power source is from wiring to the 120 VAC grid (i.e., when you plug things into the wall), then what happens if there's a power outage? In that case residents would be locked out of your own apartment when the power goes out. I don't think that would happens, so I'm inferring that they use batteries; when something uses batteries, eventually those batteries lose their charge and either have to be replaced, or there has to be wiring that goes through the door, then the hinge, then into the wall, then eventually to wiring that goes to the circuit breaker box; such wiring seems like it would be too expensive to be worth it.

These leaves batteries as the only option, meaning building maintenance has to be able to get into the door to replace the batteries. I would imagine that this is something that's done before the batteries lose their charge leaving the resident stuck outside & unable to get into their own apartment, which would mean the there's probably a building maintenance person who goes around checking each lock to make sure they're working ok. They'll have to do this, because batteries don't necessarily lose their charge at the same rate, especially if one person is unlocking their door many times a day and another only once or twice a day; each time it's unlocked it loses some of its charge. So here's my point: what if it was her apartment, and this maintenance person happened to be working on her door to replace the batteries? What if she had shot the maintenance guy?

Perhaps if someone could shed some light on the plausibility of this it would help; I've seen these types of doors with electric locks in hotels, where it's much easier for the maintenance crew to check things to make sure they're working, given that people who stay in hotel rooms come and go frequently. For an apartment, it seems odd to be using electric door locks, but what do I know?
 
Dec 2006
25,332
10,305
New Haven, CT
#76
Nov 2005
6,988
1,657
California
#77
Lawyers call police officer's story in wrong-apartment shooting 'highly implausible'
The arrest warrant affidavit for a Dallas police officer who shot a man after she says she mistakenly entered his apartment has prompted more questions than answers for the victim's family, whose lawyers called the officer's scenario "highly implausible."
"Independent witnesses have already come forward to say that they heard this officer pounding on the door and demanding to be let in," Lee Merritt, one of the attorneys representing the Jean family, told ABC News. "The contradictions begin to build from there."
President of the Dallas Police Association said this: "you can understand how a mistake can be made."
OMG!!!
How he gained access was going to be incredibly important (IMO). The rest of the story would start with that.
"Door unlocked" seemed the easiest excuse. Forgetting to lock the door is very easy to do.

If she truly did pound on the door demanding to be let in, her whole story would start to unwind because why would a person pound on their own door and demand to be let in? Who would they be talking to?

I am skeptical. Time will tell. I don't like her story because it seems off. I also have seen how some "witnesses" will come forward and make easy claims that are later found to have holes in them.
 
Dec 2013
29,875
18,268
Everything is going to be OK
#79
This whole verbal command thing has been haunting me. What are our rights? Must we comply? I found an article written 4 years ago which gave me some insight and it's not a pretty picture. See what you think.

Should we just follow orders? John Whitehead
The perils of resisting the police state grow more costly with each passing day, especially if you hope to escape with your life and property intact. The thing you must remember is that we’ve entered an age of militarized police in which we’re no longer viewed as civilians but as enemy combatants.

Indeed, anything short of compliance will now get you charged with any of the growing number of contempt charges (ranging from resisting arrest and interference to disorderly conduct, obstruction, and failure to obey a police order) that get trotted out anytime a citizen voices discontent with the government or challenges or even questions the authority of the powers that be—and that’s the best case scenario. The worst-case scenario involves getting probed, poked, pinched, tasered, tackled, searched, seized, stripped, manhandled, arrested, shot, or killed.

So what can you really do when you find yourself at the mercy of law enforcement officers who have almost absolute discretion to decide who is a threat, what constitutes resistance, and how harshly they can deal with the citizens they were appointed to “serve and protect”? In other words, what are the rules of engagement when it comes to interacting with the police?

If you want to play it safe, comply and do whatever a police officer tells you to do. Don’t talk back. Don’t threaten. And don’t walk away. In other words, don’t do anything that even hints at resistance.

Keep in mind, however, that this is not a fail-safe plan, especially not in an age where police officers tend to shoot first and ask questions later, oftentimes based only on their highly subjective “feeling” of being threatened.

The article goes on and it's frightening: Should We Just Follow Orders? Rules of Engagement for Resisting the Police State | HuffPost

I was raised to respect police officers. I was raised to believe that police are our friends and some are or at least have been. My neighbor's sister just retired from 27 years on the Chicago police dept--SOUTH SIDE. We just got together last week and she's great---tough as nails--but great....but she would throw this little old lady on the ground in a heartbeat if I didn't comply...because that's the world we live in now. Guilty until proven innocent and if you die in the process--oh well--casualties of war.

Police will kill you even if you follow directions

 
Dec 2013
29,875
18,268
Everything is going to be OK
#80
How he gained access was going to be incredibly important (IMO). The rest of the story would start with that.
"Door unlocked" seemed the easiest excuse. Forgetting to lock the door is very easy to do.

If she truly did pound on the door demanding to be let in, her whole story would start to unwind because why would a person pound on their own door and demand to be let in? Who would they be talking to?

I am skeptical. Time will tell. I don't like her story because it seems off. I also have seen how some "witnesses" will come forward and make easy claims that are later found to have holes in them.

If you look back in the thread i assumed that the door was unlocked as that is the onky logical way for her story to make sense. IT followed it up w/ how he had found it more along the lines of her banging to gain access. Either way she killed this guy, but if she didn't just walk into "the wrong apartment" there is way more to this. That's not even getting into the attempts to cover it up.

Shitstorm.