Police stake out area where American killed by Andaman tribespeople...which begs the question: Why Bother?

Sep 2018
5,666
946
cleveland ohio
#33
I wasn't trying to be sweet---just realistic. Most families (even those of WWII, Vietnam and Korean vets) want the remains returned. Isn't there an expression about "Leave no man behind"?
As far as the missionary group....it seems like I read somewhere that this young man disregarded the warnings and in fact was warned NOT to go.
From WaPo: A fellow missionary told his mother that Chau’s plan was “not to tell anyone” what he was up to and avoid putting friends at risk, emails show.

Apparently, the fishermen involved have been arrested, as has a friend of Chau’s in Port Blair who helped organize the boat trip to the island, the police official said.
“They were very well aware of the situation, but they still arranged for a boat and everything,” said Yadav, a move he described as “pushing [Chau] in the mouth of death.”

Chau's mother still thinks her son is alive. It's all so tragic. "The road to hell is paved with good intentions."
exposure to us can kill them they have limitied germ resistance, it could kill them
 
May 2018
2,432
1,667
USA
#35
Cat, I agree. Arizonans see this all the time. Hikers start out on a "heat advisory" day with a small bottle of water. Climb to the top of Camelback Mountain OR hike into the desert. Then temps are 110-115 and of course, they collapse or fall. The rescue squad, including helicopters, hikers and volunteers (including family) risk THEIR lives to look for them and FETCH the dumbheads. Then we watch the evening news and find out that a volunteer has died trying to save the hikers.
I read a story awhile back where some group of hikers left somebody behind and he died in the desert. The outfit that arranged the hike was being sued or something.
 
Likes: Clara007
May 2013
5,050
4,135
arkansas
#36
A lot of people, including myself, have mentioned the health risks to the tribe, but.....since viruses mutate, has anyone considered that the people on the island could be carrying viruses that they have developed an immunity to, but might be lethal to us?

I see a horror movie in the making.
 
Likes: Clara007
Apr 2015
1,681
1,946
Stockport. UK
#37
A lot of people, including myself, have mentioned the health risks to the tribe, but.....since viruses mutate, has anyone considered that the people on the island could be carrying viruses that they have developed an immunity to, but might be lethal to us?

I see a horror movie in the making.
It's always a possibility, that's why the chance of discovering life on another planet terrifies me. I've read HG Wells "War Of The Worlds" and how the earths microbes kill the alien invaders, but it could just as easily be the other way around, microbes from another planet could kill us.
 
Likes: catus felis
Apr 2015
1,681
1,946
Stockport. UK
#38
Globalization made diseases global also! And especially animal-born diseases( bacteria and viruses that crossed species from our food supply animals to humans) that were unknown in 'undeveloped' parts of the world where people didn't think it was a good idea to live with the animals you eat later....started wiping out entire populations as soon as the first "explorers" and missionaries left Europe by ship over 500 years ago.
It's estimated that within 100 years of first contact with Europeans the native population of the Americas had fallen to 10 percent of its pre-contact levels.:(
 
Likes: right to left
Dec 2016
4,116
2,125
Canada
#39
It's estimated that within 100 years of first contact with Europeans the native population of the Americas had fallen to 10 percent of its pre-contact levels.:(
Indeed! Up until relatively recently, most pre-Columbian accounts of the Americas worked to deliberately underestimate the population losses by making unsubstantiated claims that population densities weren't high enough (outside of Meso-America) to support a population of more than a few million people. They discounted discordant archaeological finds and the simple fact that horticulture (growing mostly corn, beans and squash) was widespread, along with managing the culling of deer, elk and other game, to support population densities in most temperate regions that were equivalent to Europe at the time.

The population crashes are partly from disease, but deliberate genocides and forced migrations (found right in historical accounts) are the greatest reason for the population crash after Euro-colonialism.