Poverty, Not Race, Tied to High Crime Rates in Urban Communities

Nov 2005
8,815
3,307
California
#1
A study of Columbus neighborhoods found that violent crime rates in extremely disadvantaged white neighborhoods were very similar to rates in comparable Black neighborhoods.

The violent crime rate in highly disadvantaged Black areas was 22 per 1,000 residents, not much different from the 20 per 1,000 rate in similar white communities.

There are still many people who mistakenly believe there is something about Black neighborhoods that make them more violent and prone to crime, said Lauren Krivo, co-author of the study and associate professor of sociology at Ohio State University.

Our research shows that neighborhoods with the most crime tend to be those with the highest rates of poverty and other types of disadvantage -- regardless of whether they are predominantly Black or white.

In this study, overall rates of violence were nearly three times as high in Black neighborhoods as in white neighborhoods. But thats because Black neighborhoods are much more likely than white ones to be highly disadvantaged, she said.
nf/poverty & crime/FEBRUARY

Some people try to pretend that race is important to crime.
Proclaiming racist conclusions based on higher black crime rates.
But the simple truth is that blacks have higher crime because they have higher poverty. When you correct to compare the same economic background, the crime rates are equivalent.
 
Likes: 5 people
Jun 2014
11,878
4,381
United States
#2
nf/poverty & crime/FEBRUARY

Some people try to pretend that race is important to crime.
Proclaiming racist conclusions based on higher black crime rates.
But the simple truth is that blacks have higher crime because they have higher poverty. When you correct to compare the same economic background, the crime rates are equivalent.
Yup. And republcians are running out of backers for the racism. Trump has revealed what racism and demagogue can do against a nation which was once the greatest on the planet under democratic rule.

I think these issues will be handled in the next Democratic President and Congressional majority in 2017.
 
Jun 2012
41,958
15,178
Barsoom
#3
This crime study ended four years before the national crime rate and dynamics changed dramatically and was limited to one city twenty-five years ago. A broader set of data regarding human nature and poverty would be why crime did not rise during the Great Depression.
 
Sep 2015
500
205
USA
#7
The conclusion that poverty causes the degree of crime in Urban communities is absolutely ridiculous. By this logic, poor whites, asians, etc, etc, would have the same rate of crime.

Ignoring the fact that there genetic causes for the difference in crime levels between races, the reason black crime is so high is because of a culture which promotes violence, drug use, anti-intellectualism, and objectification of women and the break down of the black family and lack of father figures largely caused by the welfare state.
 
Likes: 2 people
Dec 2013
33,811
19,359
Beware of watermelons
#8
The Real, Complex Connection Between Single-Parent Families and Crime - The Atlantic

The other well-known, and highly controversial, change in crime fighting was mass incarceration. Criminologists don't agree about whether crowded prisons can account for the crime drop of the 1990s and early 2000s, or if they can, by how much. Zimring himself is a skeptic, but others have argued that it can explain about 25 percent of the decline. Regardless, there is no disagreement that the majority, and perhaps the large majority, of inmates grew up in fatherless homes. It's difficult to get up-to-date data since the Bureau of Justice doesn't reliably track the family background of inmates. (They also put intact and step families in the same "two parent" category, though at least one study has found the later to be predictive of juvenile incarceration.) The 1987 "Survey of Youth in Custody" found that 70% did not grow up with both parents. Another 1994 study of Wisconsin juveniles was even more stark: only 13% grew up with their married parents. Here's the conclusion of Cynthia Harper and Sara McLanahan, the doyenne of researchers about single parenthood: "[C]ontrolling for income and all other factors, youths in father-absent families (mother only, mother-stepfather, and relatives/other) still had significantly higher odds of incarceration than those from mother-father families."

Some academics and advocates, including Cohen here, counter that mass incarceration is actually creating more single-parent families. That argument rests on the questionable assumption that men who are in prison would become reliable presences in their children's lives if freed. Worse, it implies that children—or their mothers—would be better off with a violent father in the house than on their own. There are valid concerns about our harsh drug policies, but the truth is the percentage of prisoners behind bars for drugs is relatively modest. According to the BJS, about 20 percent of the current state prison population has been convicted of drug offenses while 50 percent are doing time for violent crimes. (Federal percentages, though not the number of actual prisoners, are higher.) Violent offenders accounted for 60 percent of the rise in the state prison population between 2000 and 2008, a time when the percentage of drug offenders declined.


The Real, Complex Connection Between Single-Parent Families and Crime - The Atlantic
 
Likes: 1 person
Sep 2015
14,287
5,082
Brown Township, Ohio
#10
nf/poverty & crime/FEBRUARY

Some people try to pretend that race is important to crime.
Proclaiming racist conclusions based on higher black crime rates.
But the simple truth is that blacks have higher crime because they have higher poverty. When you correct to compare the same economic background, the crime rates are equivalent.
The Hilltop of Columbus, Ohio was a clean neighborhood when I as a young tyke. Today to find the most crime and run down houses are on the Hilltop. My parents grew up in the bottoms of Columbus, Ohio but they rose high. I ignored their advice and went on my own when I turned 18. You have to be able to walk the walk and talk the talk.