probability of life

Feb 2019
1,610
388
here and there
#1

So what is the probability of life randomly occurring in the universe?

This video is a rather compelling analysis of just how unlikely that is, unless you think that numbers like 10 to the 164th power are good odds. But that is the odds of constructing just one protein.
 
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Apr 2013
38,067
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La La Land North
#2
Indeterminate. Too many inputs needed to calculate it are unavailable.

But we know from empirical data that the probability of it happening is 1.
 
Sep 2017
55
11
Houston TX
#3
I'm not saying life wasn't created. I believe it was. But this video doesn't disprove abiogenesis. Self-replicating RNA is hypothesized to have preceded proteins according one of the major theories in this field. To attack that theory, one would need to show that it is unlikely that any self-replicating RNA would arise by random chance. When someone can do that calculation, I'll take notice.
 
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Nov 2013
2,581
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NM
#4
Geoscience Research Institute is an offshoot of Seventh Day Adventists @ Andrews U. in MI. I liked their vegetarian dishes, but they're Young Earthers, & adhere to a literal interpretation of Genesis, & are diametrically opposed to evolution. Biologic Institute is funded by Discovery Institute to forward Intelligent Design, & their funding has been murky. Biola U. is a former missionary training school that branched out into a wider curriculum, in an effort to stay afloat. In their heyday, they published The Fundamentals: A Testimony To The Truth (a series of essays affirming conservative Protestant beliefs, and source of the term fundamentalism).

I can't evaluate their math - but I can say that there's been a lot of time for nature (or nature's god, if you like) to let basic processes run & run on the solar system & the Earth.
 
Feb 2019
1,610
388
here and there
#5
I'm not saying life wasn't created. I believe it was. But this video doesn't disprove abiogenesis. Self-replicating RNA is hypothesized to have preceded proteins according one of the major theories in this field. To attack that theory, one would need to show that it is unlikely that any self-replicating RNA would arise by random chance. When someone can do that calculation, I'll take notice.
So you are saying that there is a chance?

 
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Feb 2019
1,610
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#6
Life appeared on the earth some 3.5 billion years ago, so it seems that life took off pretty quick

Then you have the Cambrian Explosion in the seas.

It is evident to me that the life process, or evolution, or creation, call it what you will, is punctuated and not gradual as Darwin once assumed.
 
Apr 2014
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redacted
#7
Life appeared on the earth some 3.5 billion years ago, so it seems that life took off pretty quick

Then you have the Cambrian Explosion in the seas.

It is evident to me that the life process, or evolution, or creation, call it what you will, is punctuated and not gradual as Darwin once assumed.
I read a science fiction story once where space travelers happened upon a sterile planet and dumped their human waste on it then speculated on what would be on that planet in a few billion years. Maybe that’s all we are: the results of aliens taking a dump on the Earth and moving onward.
 
Nov 2013
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#8
I read a science fiction story once where space travelers happened upon a sterile planet and dumped their human waste on it then speculated on what would be on that planet in a few billion years. Maybe that’s all we are: the results of aliens taking a dump on the Earth and moving onward.
A new trickle-down theory! NASA typically sterilizes its planetary landers, & maybe the cometary & meteorite explorers too, for all I know. I assume it's precisely to keep environments pristine - or @ least, to avoid contaminating them with Earth life, which might wipe out any pre-existing life already there - or any traces of pre-existing life.
 
Feb 2019
1,610
388
here and there
#9
I read a science fiction story once where space travelers happened upon a sterile planet and dumped their human waste on it then speculated on what would be on that planet in a few billion years. Maybe that’s all we are: the results of aliens taking a dump on the Earth and moving onward.
The alien theory only goes so far. Where did they come from?

Remember, the universe is only around 13-15 billion years hold, and it took most of that to form a planet like Earth to contain life.

Not much time really.
 
Apr 2014
3,170
1,370
redacted
#10
A new trickle-down theory! NASA typically sterilizes its planetary landers, & maybe the cometary & meteorite explorers too, for all I know. I assume it's precisely to keep environments pristine - or @ least, to avoid contaminating them with Earth life, which might wipe out any pre-existing life already there - or any traces of pre-existing life.
NASA is looking for life so it wouldn't do to have a lander contaminated with someone's loogie causing a false positive.
 
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