Rat and Trash Infestations Across the Country!

Dec 2018
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Indiana
July 14, 2018: Cleanup of Pence family gas stations cost Indiana more than $20 million

July 14, 2018: Cleanup of Pence family gas stations cost Indiana more than $20 million

By BRIAN SLODYSKO
JUL 14, 2018 | 1:00 PM
| GARDEN CITY, IND.




A tank at a Kiel Bros. facility is torn down in Indianapolis on Dec. 11, 2017. (Brian Slodysko / AP)

Vice President Mike Pence turns nostalgic when he talks about growing up in small-town Columbus, Indiana, where his father helped build a Midwestern empire of more than 200 gas stations that provided an upbringing on the "front row of the American dream."
The collapse of Kiel Bros. Oil Co. in 2004 was widely publicized. Less known is that the state of Indiana — and, to a smaller extent, Kentucky and Illinois — are still on the hook for millions of dollars to clean up more than 85 contaminated sites across the three states, including underground tanks that leaked toxic chemicals into soil, streams and wells.
One of thousands of taxpayer subsidies, for the fossil fuel industry, which the RW has great difficulty acknowledging.
 
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Apr 2019
4,578
780
America
People will say anything when pretty Michelle is flashing Benjamins in their faces. Just like the extremist right wing cabal did when they offered to take her out of the obscurity of being a pretty black blogger, one in a million, to a more visible pretty conservative race.

Now that she's firmly ensconced with her rich white husband do you really think she gives a fuck about blacks in Baltimore?
You think those people were bribed? Now prove it. Black people are tired of Democratic lies.
 
Feb 2006
15,760
4,313
California
You think those people were bribed? Now prove it. Black people are tired of Democratic lies.
Who are they tired of again?

Texas Rep. Will Hurd’s decision not to seek reelection highlights a big problem for Republicans as 2020 nears: their inability to diversify their ranks and connect with the black community. Hurd’s departure will leave Sen. Tim Scott as the only black Republican in Congress.

And even Scott has vowed to leave Congress after his next term.

President Donald Trump’s 2020 campaign has made efforts to reach out to black voters, hoping that highlighting its economic successes might encourage a new generation of black voters in the coming election.


Following the Civil War, Radical Republicans in Congress introduced a series of laws and constitutional amendments to try to secure civil and political rights for black people. This wing of the Republican Party was called “radical” because of its strong stance on these and other issues. The right that provoked the greatest controversy, especially in the North, concerned black male suffrage: the right of the black man to vote.

In 1867, Congress passed a law requiring the former Confederate states to include black male suffrage in their new state constitutions. Ironically, even though African American men began voting in the South after 1867, the majority of Northern states continued to deny them this basic right.

In the North, the Republican’s once-huge voter majority over the Democratic Party was declining. Radical Republican leaders feared that they might lose control of Congress to the Democrats.

One solution to this problem called for including the black man’s vote in all Northern states.
Republicans assumed the new black voters would vote Republican just as their brothers were doing in the South. By increasing its voters in the North and South, the Republican Party could then maintain its stronghold in Congress.

The Republicans, however, faced an incredible dilemma. The idea of blacks voting was not popular in the North. In fact, several Northern states had recently voted against black male suffrage.

In May 1868, the Republicans held their presidential nominating convention in Chicago and chose Ulysses S. Grant as their candidate. The Republicans agreed that African-American male suffrage continued to be a requirement for the Southern states, but decided that the Northern states should settle this issue for themselves.

Grant was victorious in the election of 1868, but this popular general won by a surprisingly slim margin. It was clear to Republican leaders that if they were to remain in power, their party needed the votes of black men in the North.


1573862301590.png
 
Apr 2019
4,578
780
America
Who are they tired of again?

Texas Rep. Will Hurd’s decision not to seek reelection highlights a big problem for Republicans as 2020 nears: their inability to diversify their ranks and connect with the black community. Hurd’s departure will leave Sen. Tim Scott as the only black Republican in Congress.

And even Scott has vowed to leave Congress after his next term.

President Donald Trump’s 2020 campaign has made efforts to reach out to black voters, hoping that highlighting its economic successes might encourage a new generation of black voters in the coming election.


Following the Civil War, Radical Republicans in Congress introduced a series of laws and constitutional amendments to try to secure civil and political rights for black people. This wing of the Republican Party was called “radical” because of its strong stance on these and other issues. The right that provoked the greatest controversy, especially in the North, concerned black male suffrage: the right of the black man to vote.

In 1867, Congress passed a law requiring the former Confederate states to include black male suffrage in their new state constitutions. Ironically, even though African American men began voting in the South after 1867, the majority of Northern states continued to deny them this basic right.

In the North, the Republican’s once-huge voter majority over the Democratic Party was declining. Radical Republican leaders feared that they might lose control of Congress to the Democrats.

One solution to this problem called for including the black man’s vote in all Northern states.
Republicans assumed the new black voters would vote Republican just as their brothers were doing in the South. By increasing its voters in the North and South, the Republican Party could then maintain its stronghold in Congress.

The Republicans, however, faced an incredible dilemma. The idea of blacks voting was not popular in the North. In fact, several Northern states had recently voted against black male suffrage.

In May 1868, the Republicans held their presidential nominating convention in Chicago and chose Ulysses S. Grant as their candidate. The Republicans agreed that African-American male suffrage continued to be a requirement for the Southern states, but decided that the Northern states should settle this issue for themselves.

Grant was victorious in the election of 1868, but this popular general won by a surprisingly slim margin. It was clear to Republican leaders that if they were to remain in power, their party needed the votes of black men in the North.


View attachment 5945
Are you trying to say blacks were smarter 150 years ago?
 
Jul 2019
12,388
8,983
Georgia
was going to comment on the number of rats I saw in just one weekend in Pensacola (my buddy almost hit one with his car, would have hurt the car more than the rat)

but sharpiegate was in process when I got, made me forget about ratgate