Report: U.S. life expectancy lowest among wealthy nations due to disease, violence

Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#1
Report: U.S. life expectancy lowest among wealthy nations due to disease, violence
Americans had the second-highest death rate from the most common form of heart disease, and the second-highest death rate from lung disease. People living in the U.S. also had the highest diabetes rates, with death rates from non-high school graduates with diabetes three times higher than those with some college. Americans also had the highest rate of infant mortality, STIs, teen pregnancy and car crash deaths.

The result is that the life expectancy for men in the United States ranked the lowest among the 17 countries reviewed, at 75.6 years, while the life expectancy for U.S. women ranked second lowest at 80.7 years right in front of Danish women. The countries reviewed included Canada, Japan, Australia and much of Western Europe.

For many years, Americans have been dying at younger ages that people in almost all other wealthy countries. In addition to the impact of gun violence, Americans consume the most calories among peer countries and get involved in more accidents that involve alcohol. People living in the U.S. lose more years of their life before they reach 50 due to alcohol and drugs compared to all the other nations in the study. In general, Americans had the lowest chance of surviving to 50.

Report: U.S. life expectancy lowest among wealthy nations due to disease, violence
 
Nov 2012
39,884
11,562
Lebanon, TN
#2
I called it now it is a 3rd thread or is the 4th thread on this.

I will post it again.



FastStats

Mortality
All unintentional injury deaths
  • Number of deaths: 146,571
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 45.6
  • Cause of death rank: 4
Unintentional fall deaths
  • Number of deaths: 33,381
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 10.4
Motor vehicle traffic deaths
  • Number of deaths: 37,757
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 11.7
Unintentional poisoning deaths
  • Number of deaths: 47,478
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 14.

US healthcare ranks in treating diseases

US does not even make the list as the worst mortality rates, But Canada, UK, Netherlands do, but the survival rates US ranks 1ST

survival rates Canada does no better than 3rd, Netherlands no better than 6th.

 
Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#3
I called it now it is a 3rd thread or is the 4th thread on this.

I will post it again.



FastStats

Mortality
All unintentional injury deaths
  • Number of deaths: 146,571
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 45.6
  • Cause of death rank: 4
Unintentional fall deaths
  • Number of deaths: 33,381
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 10.4
Motor vehicle traffic deaths
  • Number of deaths: 37,757
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 11.7
Unintentional poisoning deaths
  • Number of deaths: 47,478
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 14.

US healthcare ranks in treating diseases

US does not even make the list as the worst mortality rates, But Canada, UK, Netherlands do, but the survival rates US ranks 1ST

survival rates Canada does no better than 3rd, Netherlands no better than 6th.

Here's a fact most Canadians probably don't know: Canadians live longer than people in the United States. Specifically, women in Canada live an average of 83 years, compared to 80 in the U.S.; men live more than 78 years on average compared to 75 in the United States. Why is this the case? There are clear links between mortality rates and the way countries invest in health care and improving social conditions.

Recently, we published a study in the American Journal of Public Health on the efficiency of health care systems at extending lives over the past two decades – and it's good news for Canadians. For every additional hundred dollars spent on health care in Canada, per capita, life expectancy was extended by nearly two months. The same expenditures were only associated with less than half a month of increased life expectancy in the United States.

Why Canadians outlive Americans, and why we shouldn’t be so satisfied
 
Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#4
I called it now it is a 3rd thread or is the 4th thread on this.

I will post it again.



FastStats

Mortality
All unintentional injury deaths
  • Number of deaths: 146,571
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 45.6
  • Cause of death rank: 4
Unintentional fall deaths
  • Number of deaths: 33,381
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 10.4
Motor vehicle traffic deaths
  • Number of deaths: 37,757
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 11.7
Unintentional poisoning deaths
  • Number of deaths: 47,478
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 14.

US healthcare ranks in treating diseases

US does not even make the list as the worst mortality rates, But Canada, UK, Netherlands do, but the survival rates US ranks 1ST

survival rates Canada does no better than 3rd, Netherlands no better than 6th.

Objectives. We examined the efficiency of country-specific health care spending in improving life expectancies for men and women.

Methods. We estimated efficiencies of health care spending for 27 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries during the period 1991 to 2007 using multivariable regression models, including country fixed-effects and controlling for time-varying levels of national social expenditures, economic development, and health behaviors.

Results. Findings indicated robust differences in health-spending efficiency. A 1% annual increase in health expenditures was associated with percent changes in life expectancy ranging from 0.020 in the United States (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.008, 0.032) to 0.121 in Germany (95% CI = 0.099, 0.143). Health-spending increases were associated with greater life expectancy improvements for men than for women in nearly every OECD country.

American Public Health Association (APHA) publications
 
Nov 2012
39,884
11,562
Lebanon, TN
#5
Objectives. We examined the efficiency of country-specific health care spending in improving life expectancies for men and women.

Methods. We estimated efficiencies of health care spending for 27 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries during the period 1991 to 2007 using multivariable regression models, including country fixed-effects and controlling for time-varying levels of national social expenditures, economic development, and health behaviors.

Results. Findings indicated robust differences in health-spending efficiency. A 1% annual increase in health expenditures was associated with percent changes in life expectancy ranging from 0.020 in the United States (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.008, 0.032) to 0.121 in Germany (95% CI = 0.099, 0.143). Health-spending increases were associated with greater life expectancy improvements for men than for women in nearly every OECD country.

American Public Health Association (APHA) publications

Spending. hmm US spends a lot on healthcare that is true, Maybe that is why the US is in the HIGHEST in survival rates, mortality rates don't even make the top 14
 
Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#6
Spending. hmm US spends a lot on healthcare that is true, Maybe that is why the US is in the HIGHEST in survival rates, mortality rates don't even make the top 14
Rich Americans live up to 15 years longer than poor peers, studies find
Health insurance system – the most expensive in the world – is worsening situation, researchers find, arguing healthcare should be treated as human right
Rich Americans live up to 15 years longer than poor peers, studies find