Science--sociology--theology

Sep 2010
118
9
Fort Lee NJ
The science-theology dichotomy is well known. Most scientists, including myself, do not try to study God by performing experiments. And they do not refer to holy books to validate scientific claims. Referring to science and religion, Stephen Jay Gould wrote: "The methods of one are inappropriate for the studies of the another's problems."





Commenting on this, a theologian wrote: ". . . I would agree in part; through the social sciences, which would include historical study, we can trace the history and development of moral codes, philosophies, and religions; and we can even determine, to some degree of accuracy, which ones are effective, beneficial and persuasive; but I submit that determining the objective truth of metaphysical propositions will forever lie outside of the realm of hard, verifiable science."

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Such a trichotomy--social sciences being a third component to understand the world--is new to me. Is studying of "moral codes and religions" part of sociology?
 
Aug 2009
1,224
40
Martinez, California USA
kowalskil said:
The science-theology dichotomy is well known. Most scientists, including myself, do not try to study God by performing experiments. And they do not refer to holy books to validate scientific claims. Referring to science and religion, Stephen Jay Gould wrote: "The methods of one are inappropriate for the studies of the another's problems."





Commenting on this, a theologian wrote: ". . . I would agree in part; through the social sciences, which would include historical study, we can trace the history and development of moral codes, philosophies, and religions; and we can even determine, to some degree of accuracy, which ones are effective, beneficial and persuasive; but I submit that determining the objective truth of metaphysical propositions will forever lie outside of the realm of hard, verifiable science."

.



Such a trichotomy--social sciences being a third component to understand the world--is new to me. Is studying of "moral codes and religions" part of sociology?


The existence of God is unprovable, by scientific method or any other. Thus it is a matter of faith. Always has been and always will be. However, the existence of God is equally not disprovable.



I have never considered the existence of God and the validity of evolution to be mutually exclusive. I don't believe that a god, or any intelligent designer would design a system that required continuous micromanagement. Better to design a system that is self-sustaining, self-correcting and self evolving.



Natural selection is brilliant. Well done!