Scientists Have Created a Sound So Loud It Can Vaporize Water on Contact

Mar 2019
2,574
576
Texas
#1
Live Science

Scientists have discovered what they believe is the loudest possible underwater sound — a sound so powerful that it can vaporize water on contact.


It's not the sound of a massive underwater earthquake, nor is it the sound of a pistol shrimp snapping its claws louder than a Pink Floyd concert. It is, in fact, the sound of a tiny water jet — about half the width of a human hair — being hit by an even thinner X-ray laser.

You can't actually hear this sound, because it was created in a vacuum chamber. That's probably for the best, considering that, at around 270 decibels, these rumbling pressure waves are even louder than NASA's loudest-ever rocket launch (which measured about 205 decibels). However, you can see the sound's microscopically devastating effects in action, thanks to a series of ultra-slow-motion videos recorded at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California, as part of a new study. [Tiny Grandeur: Stunning Photos of the Very Small]

According to Claudiu Stan, a physicist at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey, and one of the study co-authors, these pressure waves likely represent the loudest possible underwater sound. If it were any louder, the sound "would actually boil the liquid," Stan told Live Science — and once the water boils, the sound has no medium to pass through.
Well this is interesting that they determined the loudest sound possible in water. I wonder if any one can think of any real world applications for this?
 
Likes: foundit66
Nov 2005
8,784
3,281
California
#2
The above article mentions the pistol shrimp - 210 decibels. Pretty impressive for nature in such a small package...
But the greatest real-life gunslingers have to be the pistol shrimp, aka the snapping shrimp, hundreds of species with an enormous claw they use to fire bullets of bubbles at foes, knocking them out cold or even killing them. The resulting sound is an incredible 210 decibels, far louder than an actual gunshot, which averages around 150.​
Absurd Creature of the Week: The Feisty Shrimp That Kills With Bullets Made of Bubbles


Live Science
Well this is interesting that they determined the loudest sound possible in water. I wonder if any one can think of any real world applications for this?
Good question!
 
Dec 2018
2,275
1,575
Wisconsin
#3
Live Science



Well this is interesting that they determined the loudest sound possible in water. I wonder if any one can think of any real world applications for this?
Fascinating. It's difficult to see something on a microscopic level and anticipate how it can be applied on a macro level. My initial thought went straight to Batman Begins, where a the antagonist used a weapon originally designed by the military to vaporize the enemies water supply in times of war. I'm sure this can't be applied the same way, but who knows.
 
Mar 2019
2,574
576
Texas
#4
The above article mentions the pistol shrimp - 210 decibels. Pretty impressive for nature in such a small package...
But the greatest real-life gunslingers have to be the pistol shrimp, aka the snapping shrimp, hundreds of species with an enormous claw they use to fire bullets of bubbles at foes, knocking them out cold or even killing them. The resulting sound is an incredible 210 decibels, far louder than an actual gunshot, which averages around 150.​
Absurd Creature of the Week: The Feisty Shrimp That Kills With Bullets Made of Bubbles



Good question!
It could be used to advance hydrogen fuel cells.
 
Likes: foundit66
Sep 2015
14,272
5,082
Brown Township, Ohio
#6
Live Science



Well this is interesting that they determined the loudest sound possible in water. I wonder if any one can think of any real world applications for this?
Drop hand held concussion grenades over the side of the ship which the sound will kill all scuba divers in a range of 100 yards Don't put the SONAR on active because that makes whales beach.
 
Mar 2019
2,574
576
Texas
#7
When experimenting with hho cells i learned that heat turns water into fuel pretty well and i can imagine that adding into the mix sound one may be able to get closer to over unity. Most people would never dare put water in a engine but people do just that in order to get more horse power. After engine is at running temp they have misters hooked up to the cylinders and that allows for more fuel to be produced in the combustion process while reducing the gas intake. If you were to add sound to the water before it is mixed it would likely result in a much easier way to release the bond structure.

The same could be done inside a simple hho cell where water is separated into fuel. Often a mix of water and potassium nitrate or even ethanol is used to release the bonds and adding sound could very well increase efficiency.
 
Sep 2015
14,272
5,082
Brown Township, Ohio
#8
When experimenting with hho cells i learned that heat turns water into fuel pretty well and i can imagine that adding into the mix sound one may be able to get closer to over unity. Most people would never dare put water in a engine but people do just that in order to get more horse power. After engine is at running temp they have misters hooked up to the cylinders and that allows for more fuel to be produced in the combustion process while reducing the gas intake. If you were to add sound to the water before it is mixed it would likely result in a much easier way to release the bond structure.

The same could be done inside a simple hho cell where water is separated into fuel. Often a mix of water and potassium nitrate or even ethanol is used to release the bonds and adding sound could very well increase efficiency.
HHO is the proper term for water which most people call H2O. NH3 is ammonia. edit: After giving more thought, HOH is the proper term for water which shows the molecular bond. Water is the Universal Solvent.
 
Last edited:
Mar 2019
2,574
576
Texas
#9
HHO is the proper term for water which most people call H2O. NH3 is ammonia.
Yes saying hho denotes that the bonds are being broke down or are broke down. The cell takes h2o and turns it to hho. Which is like you said kinda the same thing. As a result the water is broken down into a gas. In other words hydrogen to the second power and oxygen(water) vs hydrogen hydrogen and oxygen(gas).

This is how we got to the moon.
 
Sep 2015
14,272
5,082
Brown Township, Ohio
#10
Yes saying hho denotes that the bonds are being broke down or are broke down. The cell takes h2o and turns it to hho. Which is like you said kinda the same thing. As a result the water is broken down into a gas. In other words hydrogen to the second power and oxygen(water) vs hydrogen hydrogen and oxygen(gas).

This is how we got to the moon.
Electrolysis breaks down water into two gasses, Hydrogen and Oxygen. However, inefficient because of the Law's of Thermodynamics. Take out whatever of the three laws of thermodynamics you wish or void all of them and this is still a stupid idea. Discuss the Third Law of Thermo with my Mom and she will set you straight on Entropy.
 
Last edited: