Shell and Exxon's secret 1980s climate change warnings

Oct 2010
65,520
26,119
Colorado
#1
Alarmists way back in the '80s.

Everyone knows the climate changed before SUVs.

Shell and Exxon's secret 1980s
climate change warnings
Newly found documents from the 1980s show that​
fossil fuel companies privately predicted the global damage​
that would be caused by their products.​
...Recently, secret documents have been unearthed detailing what the energy industry knew about the links between their products and global warming....​
In the 1980s, oil companies like Exxon and Shell carried out internal assessments of the carbon dioxide released by fossil fuels, and forecast the planetary consequences of these emissions. In 1982, for example, Exxon predicted that by about 2060, CO2 levels would reach around 560 parts per million – double the preindustrial level – and that this would push the planet’s average temperatures up by about 2°C over then-current levels (and even more compared to pre-industrial levels).​
Later that decade, in 1988, an internal report by Shell projected similar effects but also found that CO2 could double even earlier, by 2030. Privately, these companies did not dispute the links between their products, global warming, and ecological calamity. On the contrary, their research confirmed the connections.​
Shell’s assessment foresaw a one-meter sea-level rise, and noted that warming could also fuel disintegration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, resulting in a worldwide rise in sea level of “five to six meters.” That would be enough to inundate entire low-lying countries.​
Shell’s analysts also warned of the “disappearance of specific ecosystems or habitat destruction,” predicted an increase in “runoff, destructive floods, and inundation of low-lying farmland,” and said that “new sources of freshwater would be required” to compensate for changes in precipitation. Global changes in air temperature would also “drastically change the way people live and work.” All told, Shell concluded, “the changes may be the greatest in recorded history.”​
...The documents make for frightening reading. And the effect is all the more chilling in view of the oil giants’ refusal to warn the public about the damage that their own researchers predicted. Shell’s report, marked “confidential,” was first disclosed by a Dutch news organization earlier this year. Exxon’s study was not intended for external distribution, either; it was leaked in 2015.​
Nor did the companies ever take responsibility for their products. In Shell’s study, the firm argued that the “main burden” of addressing climate change rests not with the energy industry, but with governments and consumers. That argument might have made sense if oil executives, including those from Exxon and Shell, had not later lied about climate change and actively prevented governments from enacting clean-energy policies....​

More: Shell and Exxon's secret 1980s climate change warnings | Benjamin Franta
 
Last edited:
May 2018
2,744
1,922
USA
#2
I remember being taught about global warming/climate change when I was in gradeschool (early 70's). They didn't call it global warming or anything like that at the time, and as I recall the crux of the classes was from a conservation of materials (wood, water, etc) more than on "climate change" per se. But it was definitely mentioned. I remember the teacher made us use both sides of paper and such. This was in Oklahoma, btw, the state burying mention of global warming in their "science" classes today.

The first major show about global warming was in 1981 and aired on BBC. Here's a link about it.

The 1981 TV documentary that warned about global warming | Carbon Brief
 
Oct 2010
65,520
26,119
Colorado
#3
Even when corporations discover, through their own research no less, the harm being done by their money-making activities, they will sit on the information and continue doing harm and making money and passing off all the expenses they can pass off to the public sector until the big, bad government regulates them into taking actions.
 
Nov 2012
39,952
11,573
Lebanon, TN
#4
Yes 99.999%+ of the Global warming occurred BEFORE 1880 less than .001% of all warming occurred after the industrial age

damn Ug the caveman for riding his SUV Mammoth.

 
Nov 2012
39,952
11,573
Lebanon, TN
#6
Note: NO SOURCE

What is incorrect in the Graph. Please discredit stuff it.

I have been posting from this data since the day I joined this forum.

you cannot prove my statements wrong so you deflect.'

The source is Greenland Ice Core Samples. (This was done by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL DIVISION)

You find me any ALTERNATIVE fact that shows ORNL wrong.
 
Apr 2013
35,897
24,389
Left coast
#7
What is incorrect in the Graph. Please discredit stuff it.

I have been posting from this data since the day I joined this forum.

you cannot prove my statements wrong so you deflect.'

The source is Greenland Ice Core Samples. (This was done by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL DIVISION)

You find me any ALTERNATIVE fact that shows ORNL wrong.
Dodge, dip and dance. But still no source.
 
Oct 2010
65,520
26,119
Colorado
#8
What is incorrect in the Graph. Please discredit stuff it.

I have been posting from this data since the day I joined this forum.

you cannot prove my statements wrong so you deflect.'

The source is Greenland Ice Core Samples. (This was done by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL DIVISION)

You find me any ALTERNATIVE fact that shows ORNL wrong.
This has nothing to do with the OP, nothing to do with Shell Oil Co., nothing to do with Exxon. Please stay and debate ... on topic.
 
Apr 2013
35,897
24,389
Left coast
#9
I get Axios energy newsletter every weekday morning. A big deal for the past week or so is that there has been an organization of oil producers working towards mitigating global warming. These players are also quietly trying to back a carbon tax, only under a different name. And Exxon and Chevron just joined.

The news that Exxon and Chevron are joining a global industry partnership called the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative could signal a broader pivot under two rather new CEOs, ExxonMobil's Darren Woods and Chevron's Michael Wirth.

The big picture: "I think it's clear that this shift reflects the leadership changes at both Chevron and Exxon," a source familiar with the companies' thinking tells Axios.

  • Occidental Petroleum, another large U.S. player, also joined. The arrivals add heft to the 4-year-old group, which already includes BP, Shell, Saudi Aramco and roughly a half-dozen others.
Where it stands: It's actually the second climate group Exxon has signed onto under Woods. In mid-2017 they joined three Europe-based global majors as founding corporate members of the Climate Leadership Council, a U.S. group pushing a carbon tax proposal.

  • "Exxon has...tended to shy away from joining group efforts, so between joining OGCI and the Climate Leadership Council there appears to be a cultural shift underway under Woods. This is still Exxon, though, so any shift is likely to be both slow and gradual," the source said.
Flashback: Exxon also announced in July that it's abandoning the American Legislative Exchange Council, a conservative group that disputes mainstream climate science.

The intrigue: These moves come at a time when the White House is going in the other direction on climate by scuttling or paring back a suite of Obama-era policies.

  • However, the DOE has actually encouraged U.S. companies to consider joining OGCI during meetings with them in the past year, an administration official said.
What they're saying: One source who works directly with the energy industry called the decisions consistent with Exxon's and Chevron's approach and OGCI's absence of policy positions.

  • "OGCI is squarely focused on technology. Both [Exxon] and [Chevron] are long on innovation and technology," the source said in an email exchange.
  • Exxon and Chevron initially declined to join the group when it formed in 2014.
  • But as Axios' Amy Harder noted when she broke the news yesterday, these decisions are a sign of how pressure from investorsand lawsuits are pushing oil companies to do more.
Reality check: It will hardly halt criticism from climate advocates that oil-and-gas companies should be taking much stronger steps.

  • For instance, look for continued pressure on Big Oil to take more aggressive stances, such as setting binding emissions targets and abandoning trade groups — including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce — that support the rollback of U.S. regulations.
They are also working quietly in the background to resist Dotard's softening of mileage requirements on manufacturers.

But as the quote says, odds are it isn't so much ethics as fear of shareholder's wrath and litigation.
 
Sep 2017
1,603
832
Hell
#10
Alarmists way back in the '80s.

Everyone knows the climate changed before SUVs.
Eh? SUV's existed shortly after the first automobile was invented. The first Chevrolet Suburban was the 1935 model. That was back then when people were still shoveling coal or pitching wood for just about most other modes of transportation other than bicycles, horse-drawn wagons, and sailing ships.