Should Imprisoned Felons Be Allowed to Vote?

Nov 2018
3,156
1,469
Inner Space
Mental illness is legit, but there are certainly problems with the law as you just pointed out. No one should lose their rights for life without good reason. Going through a rough spell because a close friend died in college or a family member isn't good enough but that's how the law is set up now. Remember how Obama wanted to disarm for life any vet with PTSD?
Sure. We will just test them with that PTSD Blood Test and if it is low, they can have their firearms.
I just wonder why you guys are all about the rights of the violence prone and not so much about the rights of everyone else not to get shot, raped, robbed, or assaulted.
 
Nov 2018
3,156
1,469
Inner Space
So you have no problem letting all of the Covington kids and their classmates a year younger vote? LOL

Sorry, but most psychologists will tell you, while there are exceptions, kids are not mature enough to make such decisions. If they are, do you have any problem with child emancipation at 16? Joining the military? Smoking and drinking? If not, why not?
When will you be mature enough, BB?
 
Likes: Howey
Dec 2018
1,858
600
New England
Then, after that, they may have proven they deserve a second chance:
Suppose the potential employer is a corporation that runs a region-wide chain of child daycare centers, and the job seeker in question was recently released from prison after serving a sentence for trafficking in child-pornography. Should the job seeker's record be hidden from that corporation?
 
Mar 2018
306
77
Grayson
Suppose the potential employer is a corporation that runs a region-wide chain of child daycare centers, and the job seeker in question was recently released from prison after serving a sentence for trafficking in child-pornography. Should the job seeker's record be hidden from that corporation?
Corporations can ask the government for information relevant to a job if / when it serves the interests of the public. Knowing that an individual was convicted of porn, child molestation, or physical assaults against children may be relevant to a day care center, but certainly not to a construction company, warehouse, restaurant, or office job that does not involve children. If the employer could show a relevancy toward what they're looking for, then if a job applicant agrees to release THAT information and ONLY THAT information, then you might have a point. Just because a person got a drug possession charge at the age of 18 should not bar them from working for the rest of their life. Case in point:

I can introduce you to a guy the government wanted to prosecute for purely political reasons. At his trial there was no evidence introduced, no police investigation took place, no witnesses were put on the stand. The DA failed to get the guy's ex wife and ex girlfriend to testify against him, corroborating the state's version of events . The prosecutor was allowed to use hearsay and outright lie to the jury. The prosecutor was even forced to admit that they went to the alleged victim's home and threatened them with criminal charges if they did not testify. That individual said that the allegations weren't true and how they were threatened by the DA to commit perjury.

If you were sitting on a jury and the DA went before you with that, it would be obvious that the laundry list of felonies this guy was being charged with had something more behind them than whatever was being said. So did the judge. Therefore, at the end of the trial, the judge would name each charge and tell the jury they could find the defendant guilty; they could find the defendant innocent; they could find him guilty of a lesser charge. Hell, the judge may as well have said we don't have spit on this guy, but you need to give me something. The jury gave the judge a charge of conduct of an insulting nature. That is technically a non-domestic charge of simple battery. It ended with a $650 fine. But, now, over a purely political issue, this guy became a "criminal."

As such, he lost his job and almost went bankrupt until he got looked at by an employer that went behind the misdemeanor charge. Turns out the guy was able to keep his ccw and security clearance and went on about his life. Most nickel and dime jobs would never have considered that. The guy had a ding on his record and is a "criminal." The more I thought about that, the more I realized how many people I know whose lives were changed over one infraction of the law - infractions so small, that when I was a kid, Andy Taylor over in Mayberry wouldn't even raise his voice to scold the offenders.

We pay the prison system to rehabilitate people. If they cannot do that, then they should not release people. And, if we can never trust those people again, we should execute them rather than to put them back into society. There is a reason that nearly half of the American people rely on the government for at least a portion of their livelihood. There is a reason we have more people in prison than any nation on this planet. How many homeless, jobless and generational welfarites we create is impacting this nation in many negative ways.
 
Mar 2018
306
77
Grayson
This is also why i take issue w/ the mental illness press. Psychology is a soft science and is constantly changing w/ the current political climate. Bob's dog dies. Bob is sad. Bob's Dr tells Bob to take these pills so Bob will feel better. Bob does and he does. He stops taking the pills after a few months. Five years later Bob goes to buy a gun. Sorry Bob you have a history of mental illness.
Same kind of scenario:

Dick is having sexual issues - he can't rise to the occasion. Turns out the viagra didn't work because Dick's problem is emotional. Some drugs and therapy clears it up and six months later Dick is back to Dick.

Sorry Dick, you have a history of mental illness. That ain't a pistol he's packing; he's just glad to see the ladies again.
 
Nov 2018
3,156
1,469
Inner Space
Corporations can ask the government for information relevant to a job if / when it serves the interests of the public. Knowing that an individual was convicted of porn, child molestation, or physical assaults against children may be relevant to a day care center, but certainly not to a construction company, warehouse, restaurant, or office job that does not involve children. If the employer could show a relevancy toward what they're looking for, then if a job applicant agrees to release THAT information and ONLY THAT information, then you might have a point. Just because a person got a drug possession charge at the age of 18 should not bar them from working for the rest of their life. Case in point:

I can introduce you to a guy the government wanted to prosecute for purely political reasons. At his trial there was no evidence introduced, no police investigation took place, no witnesses were put on the stand. The DA failed to get the guy's ex wife and ex girlfriend to testify against him, corroborating the state's version of events . The prosecutor was allowed to use hearsay and outright lie to the jury. The prosecutor was even forced to admit that they went to the alleged victim's home and threatened them with criminal charges if they did not testify. That individual said that the allegations weren't true and how they were threatened by the DA to commit perjury.

If you were sitting on a jury and the DA went before you with that, it would be obvious that the laundry list of felonies this guy was being charged with had something more behind them than whatever was being said. So did the judge. Therefore, at the end of the trial, the judge would name each charge and tell the jury they could find the defendant guilty; they could find the defendant innocent; they could find him guilty of a lesser charge. Hell, the judge may as well have said we don't have spit on this guy, but you need to give me something. The jury gave the judge a charge of conduct of an insulting nature. That is technically a non-domestic charge of simple battery. It ended with a $650 fine. But, now, over a purely political issue, this guy became a "criminal."

As such, he lost his job and almost went bankrupt until he got looked at by an employer that went behind the misdemeanor charge. Turns out the guy was able to keep his ccw and security clearance and went on about his life. Most nickel and dime jobs would never have considered that. The guy had a ding on his record and is a "criminal." The more I thought about that, the more I realized how many people I know whose lives were changed over one infraction of the law - infractions so small, that when I was a kid, Andy Taylor over in Mayberry wouldn't even raise his voice to scold the offenders.

We pay the prison system to rehabilitate people. If they cannot do that, then they should not release people. And, if we can never trust those people again, we should execute them rather than to put them back into society. There is a reason that nearly half of the American people rely on the government for at least a portion of their livelihood. There is a reason we have more people in prison than any nation on this planet. How many homeless, jobless and generational welfarites we create is impacting this nation in many negative ways.
Assuming that ANY of this is true, anecdote should, nevertheless, not drive decisions on law or criminal prosecution or justice. It is important to think beyond the narrow confines of personal experience for the solution to social problems.
 
Mar 2007
31,752
5,168
Pensacola, FL
Such as?

If a person hasn't paid their debt to society, why are they allowed to live in society?
I agree you should pay your debt to society. I was discussing what will follow you after you've paid such a debt. You will always have a criminal record to live with. In essence, it is a lifelong sentence. Crimes against children, murder, and rape were the ones I was referring to as deserving a lifelong stigma.
 
Mar 2018
306
77
Grayson
Assuming that ANY of this is true, anecdote should, nevertheless, not drive decisions on law or criminal prosecution or justice. It is important to think beyond the narrow confines of personal experience for the solution to social problems.
Meaningless drivel. The case is very much real and the sad part is, it happens EVERY day. Examples DO drive political machinery... think Rosa Parks.

It's when we see the way the machine really works that we admit we have a problem and work to solve the underlying issue. That is why, since high school, I've worked on bills to help rehabilitate people and integrate them back into society. The problem today is, legislators don't give two hoots in Hell. They are too busy with immigration, hate crime legislation, whether gays are taken care of, and other special interests to even consider how to make sure we don't end up having to send people to prison in the first place.

Once we send people to prison, they are not rehabilitated; they are taught to be better criminals and that justifies in the minds of some a pretext to exclude those people from society after they've paid their debt to society. My solution is: begin by identifying potential problems at a young age and get the youth on the right path. Once in prison, rehabilitate the offender and put them back into society as our equals. If they cannot be trusted to be full citizens, execute them.