Social acceptances

Dec 2018
781
10
U.S
#1
A man is not a man unless...
A woman is not a woman unless...

etc...

I think some call these 'gender' roles.


Masculinity and Femininity.

Handed down by parents to children to children to their children, hence forth. So in the U.S, handed down from grandparents to children, from children to children, starting at around the time of the Adoption of the Constitution, 1789 or so.


So... if you stop and think about, from where does your masculinity or femininity come from? 1787 or 1900?


The original 13 starred flag was not 'sewn' by men.. it was sewn by women but approved of by their males. And not the males that were 'newly' arriving in, either.

So... who's 'land' is it, really? Ours or theirs; who dealt with Native American 'treaties'?


When the United States was created, established Native American tribes were generally considered semi-independent nations, as they generally lived in communities separate from British settlers. The federal government signed treaties at a government-to-government level until the Indian Appropriations Act of 1871 ended recognition of independent native nations, and started treating them as "domestic dependent nations" subject to federal law. This law did preserve the rights and privileges agreed to under the treaties, including a large degree of tribal sovereignty. For this reason, many (but not all) Native American reservations are still independent of state law and actions of tribal citizens on these reservations are subject only to tribal courts and federal law.

Native Americans in the United States - Wikipedia
 
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Dec 2018
781
10
U.S
#3
A rack of lamb or carré d'agneau (though this may also refer to other cuts) is a cut of lamb cut perpendicularly to the spine, and including 16 ribs or chops.

Rack of lamb - Wikipedia

What is 'perpendicular'?

noun
  1. 1.
    a straight line at an angle of 90° to a given line, plane, or surface.



    Severing.

  2. sev·er
    verb
    gerund or present participle: severing
    1. divide by cutting or slicing, especially suddenly and forcibly.
      "the head was severed from the body"
      synonyms:cut off, chop off, lop off, hack off, cleave, hew off, shear off, slice off, split; More
      • put an end to (a connection or relationship); break off.

At retail, it is usually sold 'single' (sawn longitudinally and including the 8 ribs on one side only), but may also be sold as a "double rack of lamb", with the ribs on both sides. Alternatively, two French trimmed racks may be placed together with the ribs interlinked; when configured this way it is often known as a 'Guard of honour'




 
Dec 2018
781
10
U.S
#4
Eisnitz interviewed one worker, who had worked in ten slaughterhouses, about pig production. He told her:

"Hogs get stressed out pretty easy. If you prod them too much, they have heart attacks. If you get a hog in the chute that's had the shit prodded out of him and has a heart attack or refuses to move, you take a meat hook and hook it into his bunghole. You try to do this by clipping the hipbone. Then you drag him backwards. You're dragging these hogs alive, and a lot of times the meat hook rips out of the bunghole. I've seen hamsthighs — completely ripped open. I've also seen intestines come out. If the hog collapses near the front of the chute, you shove the meat hook into his cheek and drag him forward."​
Slaughterhouse - Wikipedia

The HFA alleges that workers are required to kill up to 1,100 hogs an hour and end up taking their frustration out on the animals.


I mean, just do the 'math'. 1,100 'hogs' only per an hour.... Everyday? Are they on the same '8' hour day work hours?

1,100 hogs per hour and the above person worked in 10 different slaughterhouses... Do all of those 10 slaughterhouses have the same 'requirements'?



And just think... all this so we can be nourished enough to work in/with a healthy lifestyle.
 
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Dec 2018
781
10
U.S
#5
Milk
Chicken
Pork
Beef
Ground beef
Ground meat
Eggs
Intestines/liver/delicacies
Fish/Shrimp/Seafood

etc...


It's no wonder the wealthiest 'nations' today are the ones with the 'highest' animal 'flesh/meat' consumption(s) per capita.
 
Dec 2018
781
10
U.S
#6
The most vegetarian country in the world? That would be Bangladesh,

The 20 countries that eat the most meat
  1. USA - 120kg of meat per person per year
  2. Kuwait - 119.2kg
  3. Australia - 111.5kg
  4. The Bahamas - 109.5kg
  5. Luxembourg - 107.9kg
  6. New Zealand - 106.4kg
  7. Austria - 102kg
  8. French Polynesia - 101.9kg
  9. Bermuda - 101.7kg
  10. Argentina - 98.3kg
  11. Spain - 97kg
  12. Israel - 96kg
  13. Denmark - 95.2kg
  14. Canada - 94.3kg
  15. St Lucia - 93.6kg
  16. Portugal - 93.4kg
  17. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines - 91.4kg
  18. Netherlands Antilles - 91kg
  19. Italy - 90.7kg
  20. Slovenia - 88.3kg

The 20 countries that eat the least meat
  1. Bangladesh - 4kg of meat per person per year
  2. India - 4.4kg
  3. Burundi - 5.2kg
  4. Sri Lanka - 6.3kg
  5. Rwanda - 6.5kg
  6. Sierra Leone - 7.3kg
  7. Eritrea - 7.7kg
  8. Mozambique - 7.8kg
  9. Gambia - 8.1kg
  10. Malawi - 8.3kg
  11. Ethiopia - 8.5kg
  12. Guinea - 8.6kg
  13. Nigeria - 8.8kg
  14. Tanzania - 9.6kg
  15. Nepal - 9.9kg
  16. Liberia - 10.4kg
  17. Uganda - 11kg
  18. Indonesia - 11.6kg
  19. Togo - 11.7kg
  20. Solomon Islands - 11.9kg

Bangladesh: the world's most vegetarian country
 
Dec 2018
781
10
U.S
#7
U.S. could feed 800 million people with grain that livestock eat, Cornell ecologist advises animal scientists
August 7, 1997


MONTREAL -- From one ecologist's perspective, the American system of farming grain-fed livestock consumes resources far out of proportion to the yield, accelerates soil erosion, affects world food supply and will be changing in the future.

"If all the grain currently fed to livestock in the United States were consumed directly by people, the number of people who could be fed would be nearly 800 million," David Pimentel, professor of ecology in Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, reported at the July 24-26 meeting of the Canadian Society of Animal Science in Montreal. Or, if those grains were exported, it would boost the U.S. trade balance by $80 billion a year, Pimentel estimated.

With only grass-fed livestock, individual Americans would still get more than the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of meat and dairy protein, according to Pimentel's report, "Livestock Production: Energy Inputs and the Environment."

An environmental analyst and longtime critic of waste and inefficiency in agricultural practices, Pimentel depicted grain-fed livestock farming as a costly and nonsustainable way to produce animal protein. He distinguished grain-fed meat production from pasture-raised livestock, calling cattle-grazing a more reasonable use of marginal land.

Animal protein production requires more than eight times as much fossil-fuel energy than production of plant protein while yielding animal protein that is only 1.4 times more nutritious for humans than the comparable amount of plant protein, according to the Cornell ecologist's analysis.

Tracking food animal production from the feed trough to the dinner table, Pimentel found broiler chickens to be the most efficient use of fossil energy, and beef, the least. Chicken meat production consumes energy in a 4:1 ratio to protein output; beef cattle production requires an energy input to protein output ratio of 54:1. (Lamb meat production is nearly as inefficient at 50:1, according to the ecologist's analysis of U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics. Other ratios range from 13:1 for turkey meat and 14:1 for milk protein to 17:1 for pork and 26:1 for eggs.)

Animal agriculture is a leading consumer of water resources in the United States, Pimentel noted. Grain-fed beef production takes 100,000 liters of water for every kilogram of food. Raising broiler chickens takes 3,500 liters of water to make a kilogram of meat. In comparison, soybean production uses 2,000 liters for kilogram of food produced; rice, 1,912; wheat, 900; and potatoes, 500 liters. "Water shortages already are severe in the Western and Southern United States and the situation is quickly becoming worse because of a rapidly growing U.S. population that requires more water for all of its needs, especially agriculture," Pimentel observed.

U.S. could feed 800 million people with grain that livestock eat, Cornell ecologist advises animal scientists | Cornell Chronicle


Grain-fed beef:
100,000 liters = 26417.205 gallon(s)
1 kilogram = 2.20462 pound(s)

Grain-fed beef production takes 100,000 liters of water for every kilogram of food.

Or... 26,417.205 gallons to produce 2.20462 pounds of 'food/beef'.



And so bizarre. I've heard of 'water' shortages/drought, but I've never heard of 'meat' shortages.


120 kg per year = 264.5544 pound(s) per year.

or about 0.725 pound(s) per day/365 day(s).

11.6 oz(s).

(times) the population : 325.7 million (2017)

is : 0.725 lb(s) (325.7 million) = 236,132,500 lb(s) per day.


so it might be that near or around 236 million, 132 thousand, 500 pounds of 'meat' is being 'consumed' every day in the U.S.


Not including the 'exportation' of meat(s) that the U.S might gain 'revenue' from.
 
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Dec 2018
781
10
U.S
#9
The United States has exported 2.63 billion pounds of beef so far in 2018, up 12.3% from 2017.




U.S. Beef Exports By Country (Year-to-Date)



What is 2.63 billion pounds?


1 billion is 1000 1million
2 billion is 2000 1million
.63 is 630 1million

2.63 billion is 2000 1million and 630 1million.


So:
1 million
2 million
3 million
4 million
5 million
6 million
7 million
8 million
9 million
10 million

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)


equals 100 million...


1 million
2 million
3 million
4 million
5 million
6 million
7 million
8 million
9 million
10 million

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)


is 200 million


1 million
2 million
3 million
4 million
5 million
6 million
7 million
8 million
9 million
10 million

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)


is 300 million


1 million
2 million
3 million
4 million
5 million
6 million
7 million
8 million
9 million
10 million

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)

(repeat)


is 400 million


to 1000 million... or....

1 Billion.

repeat again to 1000 million without depleting from above 1 Billion..... and you get...

2 Billion.....


53.9 billion

at age 34.... and you get....

Mark Zuckerberg


How many days are in 34 years?
12,410 days.. or... 297,840 hours.


How many days are 1 million days? 1 million... How many years are 1 million days?

2,739.726027397260273972602739726 years.


How many days are 1 Billion days? 1 Billion. How many years are 1 billion days?

1000 (years/million days)

-or-

1000 x 2,739.726027397260273972602739726 years

or

2,739,726.027397260273972602739726 years

2 million, 739 thousand, 726, and, ...... years...

Days for this amount of years? 1 Billion.
 
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Dec 2018
781
10
U.S
#10
1 million seconds.. How many days is 1 million seconds?

86400 seconds in 24 hours.

11.574074074074074074074074074074 days.


1 Billion seconds?

11,574.074074074074074074074074074 days.

or

31.709791983764586504312531709792 years.