Stormy Weather

Jul 2015
5,122
2,278
chicago
The appearance of bacteria that were capable of photosynthesis, the precursors of plants.
I am pretty sure bacteria were around for millions of years prior to the 6000 years BC where the temperature drops. On Baloney''s chart From about 6.000 BC to say 1900 AD the temperature drops. Why?
 
Apr 2013
37,129
25,332
La La Land North
I am pretty sure bacteria were around for millions of years prior to the 6000 years BC where the temperature drops. On Baloney''s chart From about 6.000 BC to say 1900 AD the temperature drops. Why?
I've never investigated that because the change is small and slow, unlike what we are experiencing in just the past 20 years or so.
 
Dec 2018
1,130
656
Unionville Indiana
From NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), for the dwindling number of doubters and deniers...

The line plot below shows yearly temperature anomalies from 1880 to 2014 as recorded by NASA, NOAA, the Japan Meteorological Agency, and the Met Office Hadley Centre (United Kingdom). Though there are minor variations from year to year, all four records show peaks and valleys in sync with each other. All show rapid warming in the past few decades, and all show the last decade as the warmest. ...
... the global temperature mainly depends on how much energy the planet receives from the Sun and how much it radiates back into space—quantities that change very little. The amount of energy radiated by the Earth depends significantly on the chemical composition of the atmosphere, particularly the amount of heat-trapping greenhouse gases
[i.e., CO2]. ...

World of Change: Global Temperatures
 
Oct 2010
66,943
27,007
Colorado
So in other words, The temperature changed naturally because the earth has a history of constantly changing up and down.
Of course many factors interplay to drive global temperatures, up and down, but, the Earth does not have a history of human beings rapidly increasing the CO2 content of the atmosphere. There's nothing natural, short of big volcanic eruptions, that has driven sharp increases in atmospheric CO2 such as current human activities.
 
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Feb 2007
5,450
3,043
USA
1961 through 1990. Exactly my point. The zero degree point is utter bullshit. Why on earth are we focused in on this short time period as if there is some average temperature to gage anomalies from? It is date cherry picking. Then to have the gall to suppose 3 degrees increase after that point, is all telling.
Nonsense, from someone who apparently doesn't understand what he is talking about.

Indeed...

...

7. Why use temperature anomalies (departure from average) and not absolute temperature measurements?

Absolute estimates of global average surface temperature are difficult to compile for several reasons. Some regions have few temperature measurement stations (e.g., the Sahara Desert) and interpolation must be made over large, data-sparse regions. In mountainous areas, most observations come from the inhabited valleys, so the effect of elevation on a region's average temperature must be considered as well. For example, a summer month over an area may be cooler than average, both at a mountain top and in a nearby valley, but the absolute temperatures will be quite different at the two locations. The use of anomalies in this case will show that temperatures for both locations were below average.

Using reference values computed on smaller [more local] scales over the same time period establishes a baseline from which anomalies are calculated. This effectively normalizes the data so they can be compared and combined to more accurately represent temperature patterns with respect to what is normal for different places within a region.

For these reasons, large-area summaries incorporate anomalies, not the temperature itself. Anomalies more accurately describe climate variability over larger areas than absolute temperatures do, and they give a frame of reference that allows more meaningful comparisons between locations and more accurate calculations of temperature trends.

...

https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/monitoring-references/faq/anomalies.php
Now, who exactly should be believed here?

1. Scientists with advanced degrees who publish their studies in peer-reviewed journals which are scrutinized for any errors by other scientists, including even by some knowledgeable human-caused climate change denialist scientists, all of whom don't seemingly have any significant issues regarding the use of temperature anomalies and base periods instead of the use of absolute temperature measurements, of which have been utilized for many decades and within countless studies?

Or,

2. Yourself, who has a minor in geology, and who seemingly didn't even understand what a temperature anomaly with a base period means in the context of climate change in the first place?

:rolleyes:

And here is an interesting primer regarding temperature anomalies in the context of climate change for anyone here who is interested in learning about why they are used versus themselves speaking out about something they don't understand.:

https://tamino.wordpress.com/2018/07/29/why-use-temperature-anomaly/
 
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Panther

Forum Staff
Jul 2013
5,568
3,187
North Texas
They only hit trailer parks.
Just a couple days seems kinda oddly low to me.

Indeed, my wife and I tend to watch the Weather Channel quite often and it seems tornado warnings are more frequent than that, particularly during the whole season.

But I guess one has to consider what size of land area you are talking about regarding likely tornados, such as your neighborhood, town, county, region, or state.

And I guess it's something I'd have to experience myself in your neck of the woods in order to get a better understanding.
Sorry. Again i need to clarify. That those are the pds days only. In my area we average anywhere between 10 - 25 watch days a year. Of course every watch ought to be taken seriously. But pds days can be nerve wracking for anyone.

Still, best of luck to you and your friends/family out there when they are nearby.
Thank you.

Just a few videos for you.

Yes. All direct hits caught on camera from inside powerfully violent tonadoes from low end EF 4-s to EF 5's.


(language)
(Yes! He was so transfixed by it that he let a powerful tornado hit him dead on and miraculously survived)

And finally:

 
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Jul 2015
5,122
2,278
chicago
I've never investigated that because the change is small and slow, unlike what we are experiencing in just the past 20 years or so.
Dude you said the increase in oxygen was because of the onset of bacteria yet we are talking about many many millions of years after the start of bacteria so your explanation of why the temps would have decreased six thousand years ago makes absolutely no sense.
 
Jul 2015
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chicago
Nonsense, from someone who apparently doesn't understand what he is talking about.

../
Not nonsense. Obviously those that made the chart, piecing bits together, are trying their hardest to get results they are wishing for Simply adding three degrees of speculation at the end is very obviously bullshit.
 
Jul 2015
5,122
2,278
chicago
Of course many factors interplay to drive global temperatures, up and down, but, the Earth does not have a history of human beings rapidly increasing the CO2 content of the atmosphere. There's nothing natural, short of big volcanic eruptions, that has driven sharp increases in atmospheric CO2 such as current human activities.
So what caused temperatures to decrease specifically?