Stormy Weather

Feb 2007
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USA
Sorry. Again i need to clarify. That those are the pds days only. In my area we average anywhere between 10 - 25 watch days a year. Of course every watch ought to be taken seriously. But pds days can be nerve wracking for anyone.



Thank you.

Just a few videos for you.

...

Yes. All direct hits caught on camera from inside powerfully violent tonadoes from low end EF 4-s to EF 5's.
Thanks for further clarifying how often you, your family, friends, neighbors, & coworkers all play the lottery of death and destruction, it seems.

:(

(I guess it takes some getting used to...if one ever really does get used to tornados, that is.)

And thanks for the videos. But, I don't know if I should consider those indivuals who shot those videos as being brave or quite careless with their own safety. And personally, if I were that interested in capturing them on video, I'd try to setup some sort of remote way of capturing them on video, if that were possible...as I watch them from a bunker underground.

(I do recall awhile back about a group of people who took shelter and survived tucked in under an overpass and they watched as a tornado passed right over that overpass. And they later described seeing bright light and some blue sky while looking up through the center of the tornado as it passed over. That must have been an interesting experience for them, and one that they would talk about at times for the rest of their lives.)
 
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RNG

Forum Staff
Apr 2013
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La La Land North
Dude you said the increase in oxygen was because of the onset of bacteria yet we are talking about many many millions of years after the start of bacteria so your explanation of why the temps would have decreased six thousand years ago makes absolutely no sense.
Originally the bacteria were anaerobic. Then a new set of bacteria evolved which used basically the same mechanism as plants do to photosynthesise sunlight into nutrients utilizing CO2 and spitting out O2.

A dictionary or elementary biology textbook would help.
 
Jul 2015
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Originally the bacteria were anaerobic. Then a new set of bacteria evolved which used basically the same mechanism as plants do to photosynthesise sunlight into nutrients utilizing CO2 and spitting out O2.

A dictionary or elementary biology textbook would help.
You should read that book because none of this has anything to do with my question to you of why the temps went down on that chart 6,000 years ago. Maybe you could tell me your actual answer.
 

RNG

Forum Staff
Apr 2013
40,099
27,915
La La Land North
You should read that book because none of this has anything to do with my question to you of why the temps went down on that chart 6,000 years ago. Maybe you could tell me your actual answer.
You asked about the bacteria. I answered it but of course it involves actual science and biology and stuff way above your head. And I responded to your question about the change 6000 years ago a while back. Scroll back and try and read. Since I was answering you I didn't use big words.
 
Feb 2007
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USA
You should read that book because none of this has anything to do with my question to you of why the temps went down on that chart 6,000 years ago. Maybe you could tell me your actual answer.
From the study that I cited earlier...with emphasis in bold font.:

...


We cannot fully exclude the possibility of a
seasonal proxy bias in our temperature recon-
structions (23), but a sensitivity experiment with
an intermediate-complexity model (fig. S8) sug-
gests that the effects of such a bias would prob-
ably be modest in the global reconstruction. The
dominance of the northern signal in our global
stack is consistent with Milankovitch theory, in
which summer insolation would drive the planet
toward eventual future glacial inception in the
Northern Hemisphere (24), excluding any anthro-
pogenic influence. Models support our finding of
a global mean cooling in response to an obliquity
decrease, though of lesser magnitude (25), and
also support the idea about the sensitivity of the
northern high latitudes to summer insolation (21).


....

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235885717_A_Reconstruction_of_Regional_and_Global_Temperature_for_the_Past_11300_Years
In other words, the results of this cited study, as well as the results of referenced studies, suggest that orbital changes and the resulting change in insolation are a likely driving force, among other potential though lesser drivers, that explain that average global surface temperature decline from the mid-Holocene leading up to the modern-era's dramatic increase in average global surface temperature.

In short, the average global surface temperature began to decline quite gradually likely due to earth orbital changes (and likely-though perhaps lesser-other drivers) as if Earth was heading towards another likely glacial period many, many thousands of years from now...until that decline in temperature was disrupted by another mechanism (or mechanisms) which effects the average global surface temperature.

And other quite numerous studies point to the drastic increase in CO2 in earth's atmosphere by human activities as predominantly being that other mechanism.
 
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imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
69,489
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Colorado
So what caused temperatures to decrease specifically?
The earth's climate results from an interplay of factors. There's hardly ever any sense to look for this or that being specifically responsible for this or that regarding the climate.

Human technologies are the "never before" factor, however, the physics behind heat-retentive atmospheric gases such as CO2 is neither esoteric nor theoretical. The more atmospheric CO2, all things considered, the warmer the climate will be. This effect has been noted repeatedly throughout the earth's lifetime. It's for real.

I'm just guessing, but perhaps the reason for the long, slow, post-ice age cooling is related to lush post-ice age vegetation, including vegetation growing where the ice sheets had covered the land, that served to remove CO2 from the atmosphere.
 
Feb 2007
5,756
3,322
USA
The earth's climate results from an interplay of factors. There's hardly ever any sense to look for this or that being specifically responsible for this or that regarding the climate.

Human technologies are the "never before" factor, however, the physics behind heat-retentive atmospheric gases such as CO2 is neither esoteric nor theoretical. The more atmospheric CO2, all things considered, the warmer the climate will be. This effect has been noted repeatedly throughout the earth's lifetime. It's for real.

I'm just guessing, but perhaps the reason for the long, slow, post-ice age cooling is related to lush post-ice age vegetation, including vegetation growing where the ice sheets had covered the land, that served to remove CO2 from the atmosphere.
Although Earth orbital changes and resulting changes in insolation (particularly in the northern hemisphere) likely played a significant role in that decrease in average global surface temperature, the change in vegetation (including the development of human agriculture) on Earth's surface also likely played a supporting role...and perhaps caused that decline in temperature to be steeper over that time period than it otherwise would have been.
 
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Jul 2015
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…..

In short, the average global surface temperature began to decline quite gradually likely due to earth orbital changes (and likely-though perhaps lesser-other drivers) as if Earth was heading towards another likely glacial period many, many thousands of years from now...until that decline in temperature was disrupted by another mechanism (or mechanisms) which effects the average global surface temperature.
....
mumbo jumbo.