The Best Health Care System in the World: Which One Would You Pick?

Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#1
To better understand one of the most heated U.S. policy debates, we created a tournament to judge which of these nations has the best health system: Canada, Britain, Singapore, Germany, Switzerland, France, Australia and the U.S.
“Medicare for all,” or “single-payer,” is becoming a rallying cry for Democrats.

This is often accompanied by calls to match the health care coverage of "the rest of the world." But this overlooks a crucial fact: The “rest of the world” is not all alike.

The commonality is universal coverage, but wealthy nations have taken varying approaches to it, some relying heavily on the government (as with single-payer); some relying more on private insurers; others in between.

Experts don’t agree on which is best; a lot depends on perspective. But we thought it would be fun to stage a small tournament.

We selected eight countries, representing a range of health care systems, and established a bracket by randomly assigning seeds.

To select the winner of each matchup, we gathered a small judging panel, which includes us:

  • Aaron Carroll, a health services researcher and professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine
  • Austin Frakt, director of the Partnered Evidence-Based Policy Resource Center at the V.A. Boston Healthcare System; associate professor with Boston University’s School of Public Health; and adjunct associate professor with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
and three economists and physician experts in health care systems:

  • Craig Garthwaite, a health economist with Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management
  • Uwe Reinhardt, a health economist with Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
  • Ashish Jha, a physician with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the director of the Harvard Global Health Institute
A summary of our worldviews on health care is at bottom.
The Best Health Care System in the World: Which One Would You Pick?
 
Nov 2012
39,234
11,473
Lebanon, TN
#4
The healthcare system I currently have.. US is the best system in the world.

Now if you are not sick, the others are great. until you get sick then you are more likely to die






 
Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#5
The healthcare system I currently have.. US is the best system in the world.

Now if you are not sick, the others are great. until you get sick then you are more likely to die






um no Report: U.S. life expectancy lowest among wealthy nations due to disease, violence
WASHINGTON Not only do Americans live shorter lives than people in other wealthy nations, but they suffer more violent deaths compared to their peer countries, according to a report released Wednesday by two of the nation's leading health research institutions.

Researchers said the violence is due in part to the widespread possession of firearms and the practice of storing them at home in unlocked places.

Gun violence is just one of many factors contributing to lower U.S. life expectancy, but the finding took on urgency because the report comes less than a month after the shooting deaths of 26 people at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

WASHINGTON Not only do Americans live shorter lives than people in other wealthy nations, but they suffer more violent deaths compared to their peer countries, according to a report released Wednesday by two of the nation's leading health research institutions.

Researchers said the violence is due in part to the widespread possession of firearms and the practice of storing them at home in unlocked places.

Gun violence is just one of many factors contributing to lower U.S. life expectancy, but the finding took on urgency because the report comes less than a month after the shooting deaths of 26 people at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

The United States has about six violent deaths per 100,000 residents. None of the 16 other countries included in the review came anywhere close to that ratio. Finland was closest to the U.S. ranking with slightly more than two violent deaths per 100,000 residents.

For many years, Americans have been dying at younger ages that people in almost all other wealthy countries. In addition to the impact of gun violence, Americans consume the most calories among peer countries and get involved in more accidents that involve alcohol. People living in the U.S. lose more years of their life before they reach 50 due to alcohol and drugs compared to all the other nations in the study. In general, Americans had the lowest chance of surviving to 50.

In total, there were nine areas where the U.S. came in below average, including infant mortality and low birth weight, injuries and homicides, adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STI), HIV and AIDS, drug-related deaths, obesity and diabetes, heart disease, chronic lung disease and disability. The differences were observed in all age groups up to 75.

In total, there were nine areas where the U.S. came in below average, including infant mortality and low birth weight, injuries and homicides, adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STI), HIV and AIDS, drug-related deaths, obesity and diabetes, heart disease, chronic lung disease and disability. The differences were observed in all age groups up to 75.

Report: U.S. life expectancy lowest among wealthy nations due to disease, violence
 
Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#6
The healthcare system I currently have.. US is the best system in the world.

Now if you are not sick, the others are great. until you get sick then you are more likely to die






um no because -> The difference probably arises from a combination of two factors, Feeny and colleagues said online in the journal Population Health Metrics: Canada's cradle-to-grave health insurance and lower social and economic inequality, especially among the elderly. Canada Tops U.S. in Health, Longevity