The biggest lie in Trump’s State of the Union speech

Jul 2015
6,225
2,494
chicago
Providers eliminated themselves when they did not choose to abide by law for financial reasons....thats their decision not the Government.
Yes that is what happens in socialism. Doctors drop out. Insurers drop out. This hurts The cost and it limits choice. What happened under ACA is people who do not work or who earn little get free health insurance. The cost of their insurance is paid by increased cost to those that had insurance to the tune of double the cost. My costs and my companies costs doubled. This is what millions of Americans experienced.
 
Jul 2019
10,683
7,398
Georgia
AND what about expanding Medicaid? There are still 14 states that refused to expand Medicaid. This decision affects over 2 million Americans. I bet you can guess which political party governs these states.
we've had a lot of rural hospitals go bankrupt here in Georgia due to not expanding Medicaid.

and we're not the only ones apparently

 
  • Like
Reactions: cwII and Clara007
Jul 2015
6,225
2,494
chicago
we've had a lot of rural hospitals go bankrupt here in Georgia due to not expanding Medicaid.

and we're not the only ones apparently

The hospitals are going bankrupt partial because of Medicaid. Hospitals do not make money on Medicaid patients. They lose money on them. Sure its better for the hospitals to serve Medicaid patience rather than indigent patients. County hospitals struggle with not having enough privately insured patients to cover the costs of the low paying Medicaid and Medicare patients as well as the none paying patients.
 
Jul 2019
10,683
7,398
Georgia
Yes that is what happens in socialism. Doctors drop out. Insurers drop out. This hurts The cost and it limits choice. What happened under ACA is people who do not work or who earn little get free health insurance. The cost of their insurance is paid by increased cost to those that had insurance to the tune of double the cost. My costs and my companies costs doubled. This is what millions of Americans experienced.
people who have little to no income get subsidies from the Government, which reduces monthly premiums for basic high-deductible coverage

the people who choose to be uninsured are the ones driving up costs for those of us who have health insurance. in the case of a medical emergency, they will receive healthcare, and can't pay for it, which drives our costs up
 
Jul 2019
10,683
7,398
Georgia
The hospitals are going bankrupt partial because of Medicaid. Hospitals do not make money on Medicaid patients. They lose money on them. Sure its better for the hospitals to serve Medicaid patience rather than indigent patients. County hospitals struggle with not having enough privately insured patients to cover the costs of the low paying Medicaid and Medicare patients as well as the none paying patients.
so you didn't read the Georgetown piece I posted?

you're on the right track with "none paying patients" though. Medicare pays, and some states are refusing that money. And in places where Medicaid hasn't been expanded, you're left with an uninsured population, and it's the uninsured who are causing the bankruptcies.

You should read the piece I posted, as you seem genuinely interested in the topic.
 
Jul 2015
6,225
2,494
chicago
so you didn't read the Georgetown piece I posted?

you're on the right track with "none paying patients" though. Medicare pays, and some states are refusing that money. And in places where Medicaid hasn't been expanded, you're left with an uninsured population, and it's the uninsured who are causing the bankruptcies.

You should read the piece I posted, as you seem genuinely interested in the topic.
You seem genuinely interested in the topic so read this:

At the end of last year, it was reported by the American Hospital Association (AHA) that Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement in 2015 was less than the actual hospital costs for treating beneficiaries by $57.8 billion. That is billion with a “B”.


According to the AHA report, Medicaid (Medi-Cal in California) and Medicare reimbursement did not cover $58.7 billion in actual hospital costs. The data from the AHA’s Annual Survey of U.S. hospitals showed Medicare reimbursement was below the actual costs by $41.6 billion, while Medicaid reimbursement was $16.2 billion short.



This is partially why your hospitals are losing money. Do you realize that the federal government is not the only funder of Medicaid? States and counties are also responsible. This is the reason they do not want to participate in it. They have been slowly going out of business because of it.
 
Jul 2019
10,683
7,398
Georgia
You seem genuinely interested in the topic so read this:

At the end of last year, it was reported by the American Hospital Association (AHA) that Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement in 2015 was less than the actual hospital costs for treating beneficiaries by $57.8 billion. That is billion with a “B”.


According to the AHA report, Medicaid (Medi-Cal in California) and Medicare reimbursement did not cover $58.7 billion in actual hospital costs. The data from the AHA’s Annual Survey of U.S. hospitals showed Medicare reimbursement was below the actual costs by $41.6 billion, while Medicaid reimbursement was $16.2 billion short.



This is partially why your hospitals are losing money. Do you realize that the federal government is not the only funder of Medicaid? States and counties are also responsible. This is the reason they do not want to participate in it. They have been slowly going out of business because of it.
well, our Republican Governor has proposed a modest Medicaid expansion, so that should show you that you're wrong with your last line there. But I'm sure it won't

and a blog from the lawyers for the medical industry isn't going to sway me, sorry

you do realize it's the greed of the medical industry that's at play here right?
 
Sep 2019
1,682
1,811
U.S.A.
THANK YOU! That is correct. JOM makes it sound like Bad People in White Coats eliminated providers. Remember the GOP mating call: You can keep your doctor? One million people lost their plans because their insurance companies dropped them. Some companies that didn’t comply with the ACA’s requirements chose to drop plans rather than change them. Even some “grandfathered in” policies were dropped.
AND what about expanding Medicaid? There are still 14 states that refused to expand Medicaid. This decision affects over 2 million Americans. I bet you can guess which political party governs these states.
I was recently informed by a Conservative friend that the difference between Conservatives and Liberals is that Liberals care about GROUPS and Conservatives care about INDIVIDUALS. I had to cover my mouth before my smirk showed. Can you believe that comment? Of all the damned-dumb statements--that's got to take the cake.
Conservatives care about individuals? Since when?
"Individuals" translates to "Themselves"....just ask your friend.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Clara007
Jul 2019
10,683
7,398
Georgia
The neurologist I know, who worked full time at his local hospital had to go to private practice, and contract labors for the hospital a couple of days out of the week. They had to cut costs, and did that with all of their doctors they had on staff.

He's losing a lot of money doing that as well. A steady paycheck with zero operational fees is much better than the alternative, apparently.
 
Jul 2015
6,225
2,494
chicago
well, our Republican Governor has proposed a modest Medicaid expansion, so that should show you that you're wrong with your last line there. But I'm sure it won't

and a blog from the lawyers for the medical industry isn't going to sway me, sorry

you do realize it's the greed of the medical industry that's at play here right?
The facts in the article I posted are facts. OK how about Forbes?

Not surprisingly, it starts with low reimbursement rates. Medicaid pays about 61% of what Medicare pays, nationally, for outpatient physician services. The payment rate varies from state to state, of course. But if 61% is average, you can imagine how terrible the situation is in some locations. Physicians interviewed in the study explained that they felt it was their duty to see some amount of Medicaid patients in their practice. They recognized the moral need to provide care for this population. But they did not want to commit career suicide – they did not want good deeds to bankrupt their clinical practices.


But reimbursement rates were not the only story. Many physicians talk about unacceptable waiting times to receive reimbursement from their state Medicaid programs. To make matters worse, these low reimbursements came on top of increasingly complex paperwork that their office staff are forced to fill out. Less money and a month late too. Not a recipe for happiness.