The Good News Is That We Probably Won't Elect a Socialist.

Sep 2019
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The Good News Is That We Probably Won't Elect a Socialist. The Bad News Is That We Already Have, Many Times.

Americans probably don't want a president who will nationalize the means of production, but we're happy to keep electing ones who grow government spending.

So Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) has won the New Hampshire primary, after coming in an oh-so-close second place in the Iowa caucuses last week (where he actually won more total votes en route to silver than the declared winner). The bad news for him comes from a new Gallup poll asking whether Americans would vote for various types of candidates, including black ones, Jewish ones, female ones, ones over the age of 70, and more. Gallup finds:

Just one group tested—socialists—receives majority opposition. Less than half of Americans, 45%, say they would vote for a socialist for president, while 53% say they would not.
Even atheists, long a group shunned by voters, did better, with 60 percent of respondents saying godlessness would not be a problem (that's up from 45 percent in 2007). Worse still, Gallup notes that "last measured these attitudes, in 2019, the results were within a few percentage points of those found today." In fact, socialism seemed less a votekill back in 2016, when 47 percent of respondents said that they were willing to vote one in.
 
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The Good News Is That We Probably Won't Elect a Socialist. The Bad News Is That We Already Have, Many Times.

Americans probably don't want a president who will nationalize the means of production, but we're happy to keep electing ones who grow government spending.

So Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) has won the New Hampshire primary, after coming in an oh-so-close second place in the Iowa caucuses last week (where he actually won more total votes en route to silver than the declared winner). The bad news for him comes from a new Gallup poll asking whether Americans would vote for various types of candidates, including black ones, Jewish ones, female ones, ones over the age of 70, and more. Gallup finds:


Even atheists, long a group shunned by voters, did better, with 60 percent of respondents saying godlessness would not be a problem (that's up from 45 percent in 2007). Worse still, Gallup notes that "last measured these attitudes, in 2019, the results were within a few percentage points of those found today." In fact, socialism seemed less a votekill back in 2016, when 47 percent of respondents said that they were willing to vote one in.
why do even the silliest trump voters believe bernie sanders, or any other socialist in any modern country today, believes the government should nationalize all production? where in the hell do they get that silly shit? this country had several socialist policies mandated in the Constitution from the get go- including a taxpayer funded post office and even the creation of postal roads for the post office, and the Navy. hate to burst any trump voter's snot bubble, but those are nationalized services using taxpayer funding that could be handled by private contractors and the like....but then add in public education, public water and sanitary and sewer services, and police and firefighter and emergency care, and libraries and parks and public roads and highways and dams and bridges and on and on and on, and we are about as socialist as any other country, except for universal health care and public college funding for students who qualify, and those are two worthy policies we need to adopt.

Sanders’ statement takes on greater significance given the context of his interviewer’s question: Bernie Sanders credited capitalism with lifting 1.2 billion people out of extreme poverty.

The moment came during an interview with John Harwood of CNBC. After Harwood asked the Democratic presidential hopeful a series of questions about socialism, he alluded to World Bank data showing that capitalism has moved most of the global poor out of the shadow of death:

Harwood: How do you factor in the significance of the fact that modern, global capitalism has substantially reduced poverty in other parts of the world?

Sanders: When you talk about the global economy, you’re right. Thank God. The terrible, terrible poverty that has been seen in the developing world, some of that is receding. That’s great. On the other hand, you are looking at an unbelievable and grotesque level of global income and wealth inequality. And you’re also seeing, not only massive income and wealth inequality, but in many countries a movement toward increased authoritarianism and away from human rights and democracy.