The Israelite legal system of the Old Testament

RNG

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The notion that it is bad comes from some faith-based belief or set of principles.

On the flip side, one could make a "secular" argument, against something such as sodomy or homosexuality which is stronger than the "religious" ones.

If, for example, it was known that executing 100 homosexuals saved 1,000 people from dying from aids, and atheist of a utilitarian persuasion could easily rationalize this.
Ahhhh, a "the end justifies the means" guy. Thanks for that, I guess.
 

RNG

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That's a basis of some worldviews, including "secular" ones.

So you object to this based on faith in some moral principle or axiom?
I've already said what the basis of my morals is, the golden rule. That fits here too.
 
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I've already said what the basis of my morals is, the golden rule. That fits here too.
Sounds like a good axiom to me.

Regardless, it comes from religious sources - even if not specifically Christian - such as the teachings of Confucius.
 

RNG

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Sounds like a good axiom to me.

Regardless, it comes from religious sources - even if not specifically Christian - such as the teachings of Confucius.
Actually we had a debate about this a long time ago. In part the debate discussed whether following Confucius was a religion, but there was some indication that a variation of the golden rule predated even Confucius. And the consensus was that Confucius was a philosopher, not a spiritual leader.

In many eastern religions it is expressed in terms of if you don't want someone messing with you, don't mess with them, paraphrasing obviously.
 
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As far as the legal system of the Old Testament goes, I'm aware that atheists have criticized it for being barbaric (such as for using the death penalty for crimes such as working on the Sabbath, or killing children in war).

From a historical perspective, however - I've heard that the Old Testament system of government was considered a fairer and more just system for its day and age (e.x. Iron Age) than other systems of government (such as Babylonian systems). It's well known that modern systems of government developed from older systems which came before it (such as how the Common Law system of the US and Britain developed up from older systems, such Rome and Exodus).

Not to mention, atrocities by modern governments are nothing new either (such as the genocide committed by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, the Japanese Unit 731, or the US bombing of Dresden).

So from a historical perspective - such as in regards to Iron Age legal systems, or Iron Age rules of war, how does the Old Testament compare to its contemporaries - or is this just an attempt to attack the Bible or Israel? Discuss.
Hammurabi..


Hammurabi was the sixth king of the First Babylonian dynasty Of Amorite tribe reigning from c. 1792 BC to c. 1750 BC.

Hammurabi - Wikipedia
 
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Actually we had a debate about this a long time ago. In part the debate discussed whether following Confucius was a religion, but there was some indication that a variation of the golden rule predated even Confucius. And the consensus was that Confucius was a philosopher, not a spiritual leader.

In many eastern religions it is expressed in terms of if you don't want someone messing with you, don't mess with them, paraphrasing obviously.
Right, Confucianism is considered more of a legal or social philosophy than a "religion".

Even then, this doesn't substantiate what "spiritual" actually means.