the wall

May 2018
3,748
2,218
Chicago
Xenophobia. Again with this crap..

native born people belong here.. Illegal aliens don't.. We do not need to support illegal aliens with our tax dollars to the tune of billions and billions of dollars every year and we do not need their violent crimes..
One more time- there will be no wall. Period. End of story.
 
Nov 2018
1,395
436
Montana
Xenophobia. Again with this crap..

native born people belong here.. Illegal aliens don't.. We do not need to support illegal aliens with our tax dollars to the tune of billions and billions of dollars every year and we do not need their violent crimes..
Again, made up numbers just to feed irrational fear of foreigners. You will interpret that as some validation of stay-overs. It is not. However to exaggerate deleterious effects and ignore benefits is the height of herd panic so essential to Trumpism... and every other autocrat. I challenge you to show that as a population the net effect of refugee over-stays is to cost the American economy rather than provide benefit.
 
Apr 2013
34,913
23,623
Left coast
"constant news"... really? You have not bothered to learn about the source of crime in the US. If you did, you would learn that native Americans are far more likely to commit crimes than either legal OR undocumented immigrants. Perhaps the "constant news" is being beamed directly into your head through your dental fillings?? Time for that tin-foil hat!!
No, it's because Lying Trump's tweets are beamed directly into the space between his ears.
 
Jul 2018
720
190
Earth
You should be concerned with the far greater crime by native-born Americans if you are really concerned with crime. Of course, if you are more concerned with reinforcing your xenophobia and irrational fears, then you should definitely concentrate on one of the least criminal groups.
If illegal aliens are so law abiding then they should stay in their own countries.
 
Dec 2015
13,770
12,646
Arizona
Why Autocrats Love Emergencies--New York Times

Crises offer these would-be authoritarians an escape from constitutional shackles. National emergencies — especially wars or major terrorist attacks — do three things for such leaders. First, they build public support. Security crises typically produce a rally-round-the-flag effect in which presidential approval soars. Citizens are more likely to tolerate — and even support — authoritarian power grabs when they fear for their safety. Second, security crises silence opponents, since criticism can be viewed as disloyal or unpatriotic. Finally, security crises loosen normal constitutional constraints. Fearful of putting national security at risk, judges and legislative leaders generally defer to the executive.

Although President Trump operates in a different political environment, his behavior, particularly since the November midterm elections, betrays similar autocratic instincts. The president manifestly lacks the patience or negotiating skills needed to deal with divided government. His response to Democratic control of the House of Representatives has been a refusal to compromise and, more dangerously, a refusal to lose. Unlike Presidents Clinton and Bush, who conceded defeat when it became clear that their initiatives lacked legislative support, Mr. Trump has refused to accept the failure of his border wall project. Unable to obtain the necessary votes in Congress, the president recklessly forced a government shutdown. When that didn’t get him his wall, he moved to circumvent Congress altogether by inventing — if not yet declaring — a national emergency. In his Oval Office speech on Tuesday, he used the word “crisis” six times in eight minutes. That is how autocrats respond to legislative opposition. Mr. Trump fabricated a security threat to make the case for bypassing Congres.

This raises a terrifying question: How would a president who is willing to fabricate a national emergency over a simple legislative impasse behave during a real security crisis?
 
Apr 2013
34,913
23,623
Left coast
Why Autocrats Love Emergencies--New York Times

Crises offer these would-be authoritarians an escape from constitutional shackles. National emergencies — especially wars or major terrorist attacks — do three things for such leaders. First, they build public support. Security crises typically produce a rally-round-the-flag effect in which presidential approval soars. Citizens are more likely to tolerate — and even support — authoritarian power grabs when they fear for their safety. Second, security crises silence opponents, since criticism can be viewed as disloyal or unpatriotic. Finally, security crises loosen normal constitutional constraints. Fearful of putting national security at risk, judges and legislative leaders generally defer to the executive.

Although President Trump operates in a different political environment, his behavior, particularly since the November midterm elections, betrays similar autocratic instincts. The president manifestly lacks the patience or negotiating skills needed to deal with divided government. His response to Democratic control of the House of Representatives has been a refusal to compromise and, more dangerously, a refusal to lose. Unlike Presidents Clinton and Bush, who conceded defeat when it became clear that their initiatives lacked legislative support, Mr. Trump has refused to accept the failure of his border wall project. Unable to obtain the necessary votes in Congress, the president recklessly forced a government shutdown. When that didn’t get him his wall, he moved to circumvent Congress altogether by inventing — if not yet declaring — a national emergency. In his Oval Office speech on Tuesday, he used the word “crisis” six times in eight minutes. That is how autocrats respond to legislative opposition. Mr. Trump fabricated a security threat to make the case for bypassing Congres.

This raises a terrifying question: How would a president who is willing to fabricate a national emergency over a simple legislative impasse behave during a real security crisis?
And he keeps tweeting hysteria, invasion, death,disease and petulance all because we don't have a wall. For the sole purpose of creating the three effects you list.

Nature didn't create a crisis for him so he is trying to manufacture one.
 
Likes: Clara007
Jul 2008
17,337
11,234
Virginia Beach, VA
And he keeps tweeting hysteria, invasion, death,disease and petulance all because we don't have a wall. For the sole purpose of creating the three effects you list.

Nature didn't create a crisis for him so he is trying to manufacture one.
Nature DID create a couple of crisis for him (in the form of wildfires and hurricanes) but his base doesn’t believe in Climate Change so they don’t do him any good.
 
Likes: RNG

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