This man ate 'expired' food for a year. Here's why expiration dates can be meaningless.

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
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32,072
Colorado
Humankind, some are starving while others are throwing away perfectly good food.

Free markets and capitalism and stuff...............

This man ate 'expired' food for a year. Here's why expiration dates can be meaningless.
Last year, Mom's Organic Market founder and CEO Scott Nash did something many are afraid to do: He ate a cup of yogurt months after its expiration date. And then tortillas a year past their expiration date. "I mean, I ate heavy cream I think 10 weeks past date," says Nash, "and then meat sometimes a good month past its date. It didn't smell bad. Rinse it off, good to go." It was all part of his year-long experiment to test the limits on food that had passed its expiration date.​
It turns out the dates on food labels have little to do with food safety. In many cases, expiration dates do not indicate when the food stops being safe to eat - rather, they tell you when the manufacturer thinks that product will stop looking and tasting its best. Some foods such as deli meats, unpasteurized milk and cheeses, and prepared foods like potato salad that you don't reheat, probably should be tossed after their use-by dates for safety reasons.​
Tossing out a perfectly edible cup of yogurt every once in a while doesn't seem that bad. But it adds up. According to The Dating Game, a 2003 report by the Natural Resources Defense Council and Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic, 91 percent of consumers said they occasionally throw out food past its sell-by date because they think it is unsafe. That food waste in landfills generates carbon dioxide and methane, a greenhouse gas 28 to 36 times more effective at trapping heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. And you're not just wasting calories and money. You're wasting all the resources that went into growing, packaging and transporting that food.​

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Dec 2013
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Beware of watermelons
There is no rhyme or reason behind 'sell by dates' also you will notice that the term expiration date is no longer used but sell by date. This is simply a recommendation from the manufacturer as to when to best buy said product to ensure it reaches your house in their intended 'freshness' in other words it is a built in refill as Americans have been trained to use them as the primary measurement for food safety and freshness yet the mean absolutely nothing.


Now. This is serious. Things that you as a consumer need to pay special attention to to is jared and canned food. If this packaging has been dammaged you can get very, very sick from them. Bulging can or bubbling jars can be a symptom of botulism something that a $5 jar of whatever is not worth the risk of.

But if you can't tell the difference between good and bad milk, yogurt, meat exc. Maybe you should be eating out. I dunno.
 
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Dec 2018
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The food network did a special once upon a time where professional chefs cooked for a gala event using nothing but food that was set to be thrown away. In some cases they went to grocery stores and got food that was heading for the dumpster, and in other cases they LITERALLY went into the dumpster to pull food. Apparently there's a community of people who only get their food from dumpster diving.

Americans throw away 100 billion pounds of food every year, we have a national obesity problem, and we have a problem feeding low-income children in public schools. I'm sure there's no connection.
 
Dec 2015
21,207
22,171
Arizona
Humankind, some are starving while others are throwing away perfectly good food.

Free markets and capitalism and stuff...............

This man ate 'expired' food for a year. Here's why expiration dates can be meaningless.
Last year, Mom's Organic Market founder and CEO Scott Nash did something many are afraid to do: He ate a cup of yogurt months after its expiration date. And then tortillas a year past their expiration date. "I mean, I ate heavy cream I think 10 weeks past date," says Nash, "and then meat sometimes a good month past its date. It didn't smell bad. Rinse it off, good to go." It was all part of his year-long experiment to test the limits on food that had passed its expiration date.​
It turns out the dates on food labels have little to do with food safety. In many cases, expiration dates do not indicate when the food stops being safe to eat - rather, they tell you when the manufacturer thinks that product will stop looking and tasting its best. Some foods such as deli meats, unpasteurized milk and cheeses, and prepared foods like potato salad that you don't reheat, probably should be tossed after their use-by dates for safety reasons.​
Tossing out a perfectly edible cup of yogurt every once in a while doesn't seem that bad. But it adds up. According to The Dating Game, a 2003 report by the Natural Resources Defense Council and Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic, 91 percent of consumers said they occasionally throw out food past its sell-by date because they think it is unsafe. That food waste in landfills generates carbon dioxide and methane, a greenhouse gas 28 to 36 times more effective at trapping heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. And you're not just wasting calories and money. You're wasting all the resources that went into growing, packaging and transporting that food.​

More: This man ate 'expired' food for a year. Here's why expiration dates can be meaningless.
The only thing I'm persnickety about is meat and poultry.