U.N. report: With 40M in poverty, U.S. most unequal developed nation

Feb 2006
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June 22 (UPI) -- A study for the U.N. Human Rights Council has concluded 40 million people in the United States live in poverty -- and more than half of those live in "extreme" or "absolute" poverty.

The 20-page report by Philip Alston, U.N. special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, says U.S. policies benefit the rich and exacerbate poverty.

"The United States has the highest income inequality in the Western world, and this can only be made worse by the massive new tax cuts overwhelmingly benefiting the wealthy," Alston said in a statement about the report.

The report cites vast numbers of middle-class Americans "perched on the edge," with 40 percent of the adult population saying they would be unable to cover an unexpected $400 expense.

Alston criticized the Trump administration for stigmatizing the poor and saying those receiving government benefits are lazy and should be working. The report found just 7 percent of benefits recipients are not working.

"The statistics that are available show that the great majority of people who, for example, are on Medicaid, are either working in full-time work -- around half of them -- or they are in school or they are giving full-time care to others," Alston said.

The report also criticized President Donald Trump's $1.5 trillion tax cut package, which Alston said overwhelmingly benefits the wealthy and worsens the situation for the poor.

"The share of the top 1 percent of the population in the United States has grown steadily in recent years," the report notes. "In relation to both wealth and income the share of the bottom 90 percent has fallen in most of the past 25 years.

"The tax reform will worsen this situation and ensure that the United States remains the most unequal society in the developed world."

The United States withdrew Tuesday from the U.N. Human Rights Council to protest perceived hypocrisy and bias against Israel on the panel.

 
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Reactions: Clara007
Dec 2015
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Well, heck yes! Of course, we withdrew from the U.N. Human Rights Council, but not because of Israel. We most certainly can't belong to an organization that doesn't support TRUMP and the 1%.
It's that simple.
Nikki Haley is a huge disappointment. Try this on for size:
"When it comes to the Human Rights Council, Haley announced the US departure from the body in June, just days after the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights condemned Trump’s policy of separating children from their parents at the US-Mexico border. Haley called the council a “cesspool of bias,” and wrongly blamed Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and other human rights organizations for the US withdrawal when her ill-conceived attempts to “reform” the council received virtually no support from UN member states." US Ambassador Nikki Haley’s Disappointing UN Rights Legacy

So, being the good little PARTY MEMBER, Haley disregards any ethical, moral high ground and punches RIGHT to the GUT of Trump's base. AMERICA FIRST, LAST AND ALWAYS--Nikki shouts--and then adds the U.N. Human Rights Council is a "cesspool of political bias"........because they criticized Trump. That can't be allowed. Under. Any. Circumstances.

Nikki, you're a good little cult member. What a letdown.
 
Feb 2006
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California
If you removed California, we'd be right there with the rest of the world.

Food for thought.
"Right" there with the rest of the "third" world?

The LAO also cites figures from a March 2016 report by the Pew Charitable Trusts. It found the federal government spent nearly $356 billion in California in fiscal year 2014, for salaries and wages, grants, contracts, retirement benefits and other benefits. That same year, California paid about $369 billion in total federal tax -- or about $13 billion more than it received -- according to the Internal Revenue Service Data Book, 2014.

Another widely-cited study from 2007 says California received only 78 cents for every dollar it paid in federal taxes.

"There’s certainly some truth to that claim" that California is a donor state, said Steve Boilard, executive director of the Center for California Studies at Sacramento State University. He formerly worked at the California Legislative Analyst’s Office.

"You look at other states and they are getting quite a bit more of a return. They are getting $1.10 or $1.20 per dollar," Boilard added. "We really don’t send out that much more than we bring back. But we get back a lot less than most states."

Mississippi had the highest ratio, receiving $2.57 in federal spending per dollar of taxes paid. New Jersey had the lowest, receiving just $0.77 per dollar.

Part of the reason California pays more and receives less than other states is that it has a relatively young and wealthy population.

"Your average Californian makes more money than your average person from Kansas," Boilard added. "So, yeah, inevitably, those people will be paying more money into the system" in income taxes than they draw in federal retirement and health benefits.

78 cents on the dollar?

Many advocates for California, including former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, have pointed to a study by the Tax Foundation as proof the state receives even less from the federal government.
 
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Dec 2012
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California's problem is welfare. We have the biggest welfare system in the nation. This state is a magnet for the poor. 10 million immigrants currently reside in California. This works out to 26 percent of the state’s population. Add another 5 to 6 million illegal aliens and it's not hard to figure out why the poverty level in this state is so high. Today, California is plagued with poverty and homelessness, and mired in high taxes and pointless regulations. It is a place of extremes, where opulent palaces overlook tent cities and crumbling slums. This is America’s future if nothing happens to stop it.
 
Dec 2012
21,193
8,621
California
Well, heck yes! Of course, we withdrew from the U.N. Human Rights Council, but not because of Israel. We most certainly can't belong to an organization that doesn't support TRUMP and the 1%.
It's that simple.
Nikki Haley is a huge disappointment. Try this on for size:
"When it comes to the Human Rights Council, Haley announced the US departure from the body in June, just days after the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights condemned Trump’s policy of separating children from their parents at the US-Mexico border. Haley called the council a “cesspool of bias,” and wrongly blamed Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and other human rights organizations for the US withdrawal when her ill-conceived attempts to “reform” the council received virtually no support from UN member states." US Ambassador Nikki Haley’s Disappointing UN Rights Legacy

So, being the good little PARTY MEMBER, Haley disregards any ethical, moral high ground and punches RIGHT to the GUT of Trump's base. AMERICA FIRST, LAST AND ALWAYS--Nikki shouts--and then adds the U.N. Human Rights Council is a "cesspool of political bias"........because they criticized Trump. That can't be allowed. Under. Any. Circumstances.

Nikki, you're a good little cult member. What a letdown.
If Nikki runs for president, after Trump's second term, she may get my vote.
 

RNG

Forum Staff
Apr 2013
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La La Land North
California's problem is welfare. We have the biggest welfare system in the nation. This state is a magnet for the poor. 10 million immigrants currently reside in California. This works out to 26 percent of the state’s population. Add another 5 to 6 million illegal aliens and it's not hard to figure out why the poverty level in this state is so high. Today, California is plagued with poverty and homelessness, and mired in high taxes and pointless regulations. It is a place of extremes, where opulent palaces overlook tent cities and crumbling slums. This is America’s future if nothing happens to stop it.
If that's true and they still subsidise red states they must really be doing things right.
 
Dec 2012
21,193
8,621
California
If that's true and they still subsidise red states they must really be doing things right.
This state is sitting on a $Trillion dollar deficit. If high taxes and regulation is your idea of right, while there are over 100,000 living on the streets, yeah, CA. is doing just fine. Should even a weak recession occur, this states economic outlook will become a disaster.
 
Feb 2006
14,491
3,018
California
California's problem is welfare. We have the biggest welfare system in the nation. This state is a magnet for the poor. 10 million immigrants currently reside in California. This works out to 26 percent of the state’s population. Add another 5 to 6 million illegal aliens and it's not hard to figure out why the poverty level in this state is so high. Today, California is plagued with poverty and homelessness, and mired in high taxes and pointless regulations. It is a place of extremes, where opulent palaces overlook tent cities and crumbling slums. This is America’s future if nothing happens to stop it.
Exactly Thank You - Share the wealth "opulent palaces overlook tent cities and crumbling slums"

The main goal of Bernie Sanders’ decades-long career in politics has been to address the root causes of economic inequality because, as he has stated, “The middle class of this country, over the last forty years, has been disappearing.”

The other side of the coin is that the super-rich and large corporations do not pay their fair share in taxes, instead they horde their wealth and stash it in overseas tax havens. Bernie wants to reform the tax code by removing tax loopholes and tax breaks that only benefit the rich and large corporations, raising the tax rates for the wealthiest Americans, taxing the fortunes of the top 0.2%, taxing capital gains and qualified dividends income as ordinary income, and taxing Wall Street speculation.


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  1. California (Population: 39,747,267)
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