U.s. Troops Posed With Body Parts Of Afghan Bombers

Feb 2007
34,677
17
Los Angeles
Is this wrong?



[font=Georgia,]The 82nd Airborne Division soldiers arrived at the police station in [/font]Afghanistan's[font=Georgia,] Zabol province in February 2010. They inspected the body parts. Then the mission turned macabre: The paratroopers posed for photos next to Afghan police, grinning while some held — and others squatted beside — the corpse's severed legs.[/font]



[font=Georgia,]A few months later, the same platoon was dispatched to investigate the remains of three insurgents who Afghan police said had accidentally blown themselves up. After obtaining a few fingerprints, they posed next to the remains, again grinning and mugging for photographs.[/font]




[font=Georgia,]Two soldiers posed holding a dead man's hand with the middle finger raised. A soldier leaned over the bearded corpse while clutching the man's hand. Someone placed an unofficial platoon patch reading "Zombie Hunter" next to other remains and took a picture.[/font]



The Army[font=Georgia,] launched a criminal investigation after the Los Angeles Times showed officials copies of the photos, which recently were given to the paper by a soldier from the division.[/font]



[font=Georgia,]"It is a violation of Army standards to pose with corpses for photographs outside of officially sanctioned purposes," said [/font]George Wright[font=Georgia,], an Army spokesman. "Such actions fall short of what we expect of our uniformed service members in deployed areas."[/font]



[font=Georgia,]Wright said that after the investigation, the Army would "take appropriate action" against those involved. Most of the soldiers in the photos have been identified, said Lt. Col. Margaret Kageleiry, an Army spokeswoman.[/font]




U.S. military officials asked The Times not to publish any of the pictures.





Times Editor Davan Maharaj said, "After careful consideration, we decided that publishing a small but representative selection of the photos would fulfill our obligation to readers to report vigorously and impartially on all aspects of the American mission in Afghanistan, including the allegation that the images reflect a breakdown in unit discipline that was endangering U.S. troops."



The photos were taken during a yearlong deployment of the 3,500-member brigade, which lost 35 men during that time, according to icasualties.org, a website that tracks casualties. At least 23 were killed by homemade bombs or suicide bombers.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-afghan-photos-20120418,0,5032601.story
 
Mar 2012
4,883
1,200
Canada
It's dumb, immature and very disrespectful. But, it's unnecessary to call it criminal about the incident.
 
Feb 2007
34,677
17
Los Angeles
We train these young men to be warriors and to kill on our behalf.



I don't think we should overly criticise them when they celebrate the deaths of the enemy. Especially in cases like this when the enemy blew themselves up.



We never hear about the opposite situation, when US and NATO medics find themselves providing the best available medical treatment to insurgents who, moments earlier, were trying to kill them
 
May 2007
6,036
1,222
USA
We train these young men to be warriors and to kill on our behalf.



I don't think we should overly criticise them when they celebrate the deaths of the enemy. Especially in cases like this when the enemoy blew themselves up.



We never hear about the opposite situation, when US and NATO medics find themselves providing the best available medical treatment to insurgents who, moments earlier, were trying to kill them


War is savage and brutal. There's a bit of irony in people being aghast when some don't "play nice," so to speak.
 
Jun 2008
7,895
10
Northern California
We train these young men to be warriors and to kill on our behalf.



I don't think we should overly criticise them when they celebrate the deaths of the enemy. Especially in cases like this when the enemy blew themselves up.



We never hear about the opposite situation, when US and NATO medics find themselves providing the best available medical treatment to insurgents who, moments earlier, were trying to kill them


I agree.....also, what do we expect when we put these poor kids on multiple deployments into the horrors of an endless war????!!!!



The average guy sitting at home has no idea what these kids go through daily....and then they come back to inadequate healthcare and psychological care.



...and to be fair, cartoons set these people off, so it is foolish to then worry that this will.