U.S. Women's Soccer: We've got one more to go!

Dec 2015
17,337
16,320
Arizona
#1
The United States stared down its toughest test of the Women’s World Cup on Tuesday, riding two first-half goals and a late save on a penalty kick to defeat England, 2-1, in a thrilling semifinal in Lyon, France.

Christen Press, a surprise starter in place of the injured Megan Rapinoe, and Alex Morgan, on her 30th birthday, scored for the Americans. But it was goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher, a quiet Connecticut native starting in her first World Cup, who delivered the game-saving moment by stopping a penalty kick that would have tied the score in the 84th minute. The victory sent the Americans back to the final, and kept alive their hopes of defending the world title they won in Canada four years ago.

United States Coach Jill Ellis and U.S. Soccer gave no reason before the match for the surprising absence of Megan Rapinoe, one of the team’s captains and locker-room leaders, from the starting lineup. Rapinoe emerged from the locker room for pregame warm-ups but did not take part, and afterward she confirmed that she had picked up an injury after scoring two goals in a quarterfinal win over France on Friday.

AS with so many equality issues, U.S. Women's Soccer continues to fight for equitable pay, claiming gender bias. They find themselves entrenched in a legal battle with US Soccer. On March 8, 28 players filed a complaint in the US District Court in Los Angeles alleging that US Soccer practices gender-based pay-discrimination in their national team programs. The complaint also alleges that US Soccer denies the players "equal playing, training and travel conditions and promotes [the women's] games less compared with the men's soccer team." In all the players allege that US Soccer has violated the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Wall Street Journal conducted an audit of US Soccer’s available financials and found that US Soccer is correct in their assertion that the revenue numbers between the two national teams are not equal. The WNT team has out-earned the MNT by $1.87 million since 2016.
The WNT is paid significantly less for performing the same job as the men, despite outperforming the MNT on the pitch and in revenue generation since 2016.


USWNT Fight For Equality In The U.S. While Taking On The World In The World Cup
 
Dec 2015
17,337
16,320
Arizona
#3
The United States stared down its toughest test of the Women’s World Cup on Tuesday, riding two first-half goals and a late save on a penalty kick to defeat England, 2-1, in a thrilling semifinal in Lyon, France.

Christen Press, a surprise starter in place of the injured Megan Rapinoe, and Alex Morgan, on her 30th birthday, scored for the Americans. But it was goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher, a quiet Connecticut native starting in her first World Cup, who delivered the game-saving moment by stopping a penalty kick that would have tied the score in the 84th minute. The victory sent the Americans back to the final, and kept alive their hopes of defending the world title they won in Canada four years ago.

United States Coach Jill Ellis and U.S. Soccer gave no reason before the match for the surprising absence of Megan Rapinoe, one of the team’s captains and locker-room leaders, from the starting lineup. Rapinoe emerged from the locker room for pregame warm-ups but did not take part, and afterward she confirmed that she had picked up an injury after scoring two goals in a quarterfinal win over France on Friday.

AS with so many equality issues, U.S. Women's Soccer continues to fight for equitable pay, claiming gender bias. They find themselves entrenched in a legal battle with US Soccer. On March 8, 28 players filed a complaint in the US District Court in Los Angeles alleging that US Soccer practices gender-based pay-discrimination in their national team programs. The complaint also alleges that US Soccer denies the players "equal playing, training and travel conditions and promotes [the women's] games less compared with the men's soccer team." In all the players allege that US Soccer has violated the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Wall Street Journal conducted an audit of US Soccer’s available financials and found that US Soccer is correct in their assertion that the revenue numbers between the two national teams are not equal. The WNT team has out-earned the MNT by $1.87 million since 2016.
The WNT is paid significantly less for performing the same job as the men, despite outperforming the MNT on the pitch and in revenue generation since 2016.


USWNT Fight For Equality In The U.S. While Taking On The World In The World Cup
Love this photo!
HmG9OVB - Imgur.jpg
V41usin - Imgur.jpg
 
Dec 2015
17,337
16,320
Arizona
#7
The next time someone claims that WOMEN are paid equal to men in this country, point to the U.S. Women's Soccer Team:
USA World Cup win proves female players deserve equal pay, team says - CNN

The US Women's National Team sealed the deal with its fourth stunning victory Sunday at the World Cup, but the players are still fighting another battle back home.
The soccer team's 2-0 victory against the Netherlands proved that the US women are still at the top of the game -- and, the athletes say, that they should be paid as equal to men.
"At this moment of tremendous pride for America, the sad equation remains all too clear, and Americans won't stand for it anymore. These athletes generate more revenue and garner higher TV ratings but get paid less simply because they are women," said Molly Levinson, spokeswoman for the USWNT players in their equal pay lawsuit.
"It is time for the Federation to correct this disparity once and for all."
During the celebrations Sunday, the crowd at the soccer stadium in Lyon chanted, "Equal pay" in support of the women's efforts.
 
Dec 2006
26,692
11,865
New Haven, CT
#10

Similar Discussions