US drops out from top 20 democratic countries

Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#12
I am pretty certain that Trump was not around in 1787 to have a hand in writing the Constitution, and that a governing document whose core foundation is federalism has any relevance to isolationist policies of islands.
why do we even care what people thought in 1787 they are long dead white men
 
Likes: Lyzza
Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#13
The Constitution is an anti-democratic doctrine by design. I do not care about what other countries are on some list nor do I care about some arbitrary list of country's ranking regarding their democratic ranking.
The United States of America is a type of Democracy [not a pure direct democracy, as is the classical meaning of the term, but a mixed-Republic with a representative democracy and democratic spirit]. The United States of America is a Democracy - Fact or Myth?
 
Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#14
The Constitution is an anti-democratic doctrine by design. I do not care about what other countries are on some list nor do I care about some arbitrary list of country's ranking regarding their democratic ranking.
if it is it needs to be burned and forgotten
 
Nov 2012
39,952
11,573
Lebanon, TN
#15
Total dodge of my question. Why do you make irrelevant, pompous statements and not justify them?

Oh sorry, the answer to my question was in the question.
No it is not a dodge of the question it is the correct answer to your question, Maybe you should not be asking Highschool questions when you have mind of a 3rd grader


The founders wanted NOTHING to do with a democracy it is mob Rule.

They wanted powers divided among States and Federal government Both with limits upon which they can govern the individuals.



"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote!”
― Benjamin Franklin
 
Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#16
No it is not a dodge of the question it is the correct answer to your question, Maybe you should not be asking Highschool questions when you have mind of a 3rd grader


The founders wanted NOTHING to do with a democracy it is mob Rule.

They wanted powers divided among States and Federal government Both with limits upon which they can govern the individuals.



"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote!”
― Benjamin Franklin
again those quotes? fabricated ben franklin never said anything of the sort, can you even fact check? wait your from tennessee, well you can read, so i'm from ohio, listen to me

“The banks of the Ohio River,” wrote Alexis de Tocqueville in 1831, “provided the final demonstration…[that] time and again, in general, the colony that had no slaves was more populous and prosperous than the one where slavery was in force.” Tocqueville described Kentucky as being a place where “society has gone to sleep…[where] it is nature that seems active and alive, whereas man is idle.” The neighboring state Ohio, on the other hand, “on all sides [has] evidence of comfort; man appears rich and contented; he works.” (Tocqueville, 1835)
 
Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#17
1.] I often hear people argue (often quite militantly) that the United States is a republic, not a democracy. But that's a false dichotomy. A common definition of "republic" is, to quote the American Heritage Dictionary, "A political order in which the supreme power lies in a body of citizens who are entitled to vote for officers and representatives responsible to them" — we are that. A common definition of "democracy" is, "Government by the people, exercised either directly or through elected representatives" — we are that, too.
The United States is not a direct democracy, in the sense of a country in which laws (and other government decisions) are made predominantly by majority vote. Some lawmaking is done this way, on the state and local levels, but it's only a tiny fraction of all lawmaking. But we are a representative democracy, which is a form of democracy.
[2.] And the same two meanings of "democracy" (sometimes direct democracy, sometimes popular self-government more generally) existed at the founding of the republic as well. Some framing-era commentators made arguments that distinguished "democracy" and "republic"; see, for instance, the Federalist (No. 10), as well as other numbers of the Federalist papers. But even in that era, "representative democracy" was understood as a form of democracy, alongside "pure democracy": John Adams used the term "representative democracy" in 1794; so did Noah Webster in 1785; so did St. George Tucker in his 1803 edition of Blackstone; so did Thomas Jefferson in 1815. Tucker's Blackstone likewise uses "democracy" to describe a representative democracy, even when the qualifier "representative" is omitted.
Likewise, James Wilson, one of the main drafters of the Constitution and one of the first Supreme Court justices, defended the Constitution in 1787 by speaking of the three forms of government being the "monarchical, aristocratical, and democratical," and said that in a democracy the sovereign power is "inherent in the people, and is either exercised by themselves or by their representatives." Chief Justice John Marshall — who helped lead the fight in the 1788 Virginia Convention for ratifying the U.S. Constitution — likewise defended the Constitution in that convention by describing it as implementing "democracy" (as opposed to "despotism"), and without the need to even add the qualifier "representative."
 
Dec 2012
19,430
8,313
California
#18
Hey jimmy, does that apply to Parliamentary systems too. What country in the world is a democracy by the definition you are using?

Other than ancient Greece for short periods of course. And even then, definition of citizen was very questionable.
We are a Republic, under Constitutional law, not a democracy.
 
Dec 2012
19,430
8,313
California
#20
1.] I often hear people argue (often quite militantly) that the United States is a republic, not a democracy. But that's a false dichotomy. A common definition of "republic" is, to quote the American Heritage Dictionary, "A political order in which the supreme power lies in a body of citizens who are entitled to vote for officers and representatives responsible to them" — we are that. A common definition of "democracy" is, "Government by the people, exercised either directly or through elected representatives" — we are that, too.
The United States is not a direct democracy, in the sense of a country in which laws (and other government decisions) are made predominantly by majority vote. Some lawmaking is done this way, on the state and local levels, but it's only a tiny fraction of all lawmaking. But we are a representative democracy, which is a form of democracy.
[2.] And the same two meanings of "democracy" (sometimes direct democracy, sometimes popular self-government more generally) existed at the founding of the republic as well. Some framing-era commentators made arguments that distinguished "democracy" and "republic"; see, for instance, the Federalist (No. 10), as well as other numbers of the Federalist papers. But even in that era, "representative democracy" was understood as a form of democracy, alongside "pure democracy": John Adams used the term "representative democracy" in 1794; so did Noah Webster in 1785; so did St. George Tucker in his 1803 edition of Blackstone; so did Thomas Jefferson in 1815. Tucker's Blackstone likewise uses "democracy" to describe a representative democracy, even when the qualifier "representative" is omitted.
Likewise, James Wilson, one of the main drafters of the Constitution and one of the first Supreme Court justices, defended the Constitution in 1787 by speaking of the three forms of government being the "monarchical, aristocratical, and democratical," and said that in a democracy the sovereign power is "inherent in the people, and is either exercised by themselves or by their representatives." Chief Justice John Marshall — who helped lead the fight in the 1788 Virginia Convention for ratifying the U.S. Constitution — likewise defended the Constitution in that convention by describing it as implementing "democracy" (as opposed to "despotism"), and without the need to even add the qualifier "representative."
Democracy, depending on your definition, requires a direct vote. Norwegians vote for Party only. There is no direct vote for specific representatives.
 

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