Veteran died in police custody. His body was returned to his family with some organs missing

Nov 2005
9,002
3,483
California
#1
Two days before he died, Everett Palmer Jr. called his brother, Dwayne, to tell him he was on his way from Delaware to New York to visit him and their sick mother. But first, he said, he wanted to resolve an outstanding DUI warrant from an incident in 2016 in Pennsylvania to make sure his license was valid for the drive to see his family.
The phone call was the last time the family would hear from the 41-year-old US Army veteran and father of two.
On April 9, 2018, two days later, the family was told that Palmer had died in police custody at the York County Prison. Fourteen months later, the Palmers say they still don't know what really happened. But they are suspicious because when Palmer's body was returned to them, his throat, heart and brain were missing.
"This entire case smacks of a cover-up," civil rights attorney Lee Merritt told CNN by phone.
The family hired Merritt to help find answers because so far, they have been unable to get them on their own, they say. Merritt says prison and county officials have not been cooperative with providing an official manner of death.
Representatives for the prison could not be reached for comment Friday.
An initial autopsy by the York County Coroner's Office stated Palmer died after an incident "following an excited state" during which he "began hitting his head against the inside of his cell door" and was restrained. The report says Palmer became agitated as a result of "methamphetamine toxicity." A probable "sickling red cell disorder" as listed as a contributing factor.
According to his family, Palmer never had any health problems leading up to his death. They also say the autopsy report of him hitting himself are completely out of character.
The York County Coroner's Office updated its autopsy results on July 28, 2018, to include a manner of death, which it listed as "undetermined." The autopsy report says details of the autopsy may be corrected as more information becomes available.
Everett Palmer, an Army vet, died in police custody and some organs are missing - CNN

When police ask you questions and you exercise your fifth amendment right, there are plenty of occasions where they start threatening with arrest and detaining you.
When it's the police that need to answer the questions, suddenly it's all well and good (for them) that they don't answer...
 
Sep 2015
14,302
5,086
Brown Township, Ohio
#3
Everett Palmer, an Army vet, died in police custody and some organs are missing - CNN

When police ask you questions and you exercise your fifth amendment right, there are plenty of occasions where they start threatening with arrest and detaining you.
When it's the police that need to answer the questions, suddenly it's all well and good (for them) that they don't answer...
My old shipmate recently drove the wrong way on I-70 and then hit a gas pump, and he does not drink or do drugs. I drink and smoke pot and now I have to drive my new Jeep to do his chores, the horror.
 
Apr 2013
38,382
26,363
La La Land North
#7
You know how in many US states cops can confiscate cash, cars etc. without what I would call due process and it's a great source of funds? Well, maybe in that state they have extended this to organs. There is a hell of a market for them in the right places.
 
Dec 2013
33,811
19,360
Beware of watermelons
#10