Was Communism really all bad?

May 2018
3,768
2,231
Chicago
#2
Umm, yes it was. It got perverted and turned into totalitarianism. I think we need to be real and understand that this type of thing only works on a small scale. And even then, power dynamics can pervert it. Communism only works if everyone is on the same page and trusts one another. That can work on a very small scale, for instance like co-ops in an apartment building.

Outside of that small scale it becomes a disaster, like we saw in the former Soviet Union. What it ignores, like many idealistic forms of government, is the human equation. It also denies individual achievement. It's an extreme, and no extreme survives for long.

Now it may sound like I am arguing for pure capitalism. I'm not. We saw what that did during the industrial revolution. The best solution is a combination of the two- some things are best left to government to run and some thing are best left to the free market. In other words, some things need to be dealt with collectively, while others are best left to the individual. That's the place we are right now in the US, figuring out which is which.

Many first world countries have already figured out this balance, the fact that we have not yet done so is exactly what is harming us. For example, no corporation in Europe or Canada has to provide health insurance to their employees. In the US, they do, which drives up costs of our products. It makes us less competitive. So what is our reaction? Outsourcing, rather than doing what the rest of the world does with regard to health care.

Why do US companies outsource? Because its cheaper to do business elsewhere, where they don't have to pay healthcare for employees. It's a no-brainer folks. US workers are way too expensive because we hang on to the outdated notion that health care should stay in the hands of private corporations. Once we get rid of that one outdated notion, we'll be more competitive.
 
Last edited:
Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#3
Umm, yes it was. It got perverted and turned into totalitarianism. I think we need to be real and understand that this type of thing only works on a small scale. And even then, power dynamics can pervert it. Communism only works if everyone is on the same page and trusts one another. That can work on a very small scale, for instance like co-ops in an apartment building.

Outside of that small scale it becomes a disaster, like we saw in the former Soviet Union. What it ignores, like many idealistic forms of government, is the human equation. It also denies individual achievement. It's an extreme, and no extreme survives for long.

Now it may sound like I am arguing for pure capitalism. I'm not. We saw what that did during the industrial revolution. The best solution is a combination of the two- some things are best left to government to run and some thing are best left to the free market. In other words, some things need to be dealt with collectively, while others are best left to the individual. That's the place we are right now in the US, figuring out which is which.

Many first world countries have already figured out this balance, the fact that we have not yet done so is exactly what is harming us. For example, no corporation in Europe or Canada has to provide health insurance to their employees. In the US, they do, which drives up costs of our products. It makes us less competitive. So what is our reaction? Outsourcing, rather than doing what the rest of the world does with regard to health care.

Why do US companies outsource? Because its cheaper to do business elsewhere, where they don't have to pay healthcare for employees. It's a no-brainer folks. US workers are way too expensive because we hang on to the outdated notion that health care should stay in the hands of private corporations. Once we get rid of that one outdated notion, we'll be more competitive.
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