Watch the Space X Falcon Heavy launch

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
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It's a moving target!!!!

From the SpaceX website:

SpaceX is targeting Thursday, April 11 for a Falcon Heavy launch of the Arabsat-6A satellite from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch window opens at 6:35 p.m. EDT, or 22:35 UTC, and closes at 8:31 p.m. EDT, or 00:31 UTC on Friday, April 12. The satellite will be deployed approximately 34 minutes after liftoff.

All the other launch windows were ~2 hours. I wonder if what's on their website is a typo, or, as I suspect, if they are referring to 00:31 UTC, which is Friday UTC time.
 
Nov 2012
11,231
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nirvana
It's a moving target!!!!

From the SpaceX website:

SpaceX is targeting Thursday, April 11 for a Falcon Heavy launch of the Arabsat-6A satellite from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch window opens at 6:35 p.m. EDT, or 22:35 UTC, and closes at 8:31 p.m. EDT, or 00:31 UTC on Friday, April 12. The satellite will be deployed approximately 34 minutes after liftoff.

All the other launch windows were ~2 hours. I wonder if what's on their website is a typo, or, as I suspect, if they are referring to 00:31 UTC, which is Friday UTC time.
Smooth.

SpaceX Falcon Heavy Sticks Triple Rocket Landing with 1st Commercial Launch
 

RNG

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Apr 2013
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That is something awesome. Beating the ass off Boeing too. Mind you, they got other things on their mind right now.
 

imaginethat

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Oct 2010
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Here's the video!


19:40 - T-minus 15 seconds before launch.

27:30 - Beginning the landing of side boosters

29:25 - Beginning of center booster landing

The first time SpaceX landed all three!
 

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
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That is something awesome. Beating the ass off Boeing too. Mind you, they got other things on their mind right now.
Yes, it's a Boeing-Lockheed Martin combo, United Launch Alliance, and despite government subsidies, ULA is totally outdone by SpaceX.

Take average cost per launch. ULA $380-420M vs $135M for SpaceX.

The ULA heavy-lift rocket is the Vulcan. It's first stage is powered by a pair of BE-4 engines, for 1.1M lbs. of thrust. The BE-4 is scheduled for in-flight testing in 2021

The Falcon Heavy is flying, develops 3.1M lbs. of first stage thrust, and the boosters were all recovered today.

Vulcan:
Payload to LEO 34,900 kg (76,900 lb)[2] (Vulcan Heavy Centaur)
Payload to GTO 16,300 kg (35,900 lb)[2](Vulcan Heavy Centaur)
Payload to GEO 7,200 kg (15,900 lb)[2](Vulcan Heavy Centaur)

Falcon Heavy
Payload to LEO (28.5°) 63,800 kg (140,700 lb)[3]
Payload to GTO (27°) 26,700 kg (58,900 lb)[3]
Payload to Mars 16,800 kg (37,000 lb)[3]
Payload to Pluto 3,500 kg (7,700 lb)[3]

ULA planned to use Russian RD-180 engines until the Ukrainian crisis in 2014. That's when it contracted with Blue Origen to build the BE-4 engines.

SpaceX designed and flew the Merlin engine in about two years.

We just saw SpaceX stick landing all the first stage boosters intact. ULA has a different plan.

It "announced in 2015 a feature they could subsequently develop which would make the first stage partly reusable: allowing the engines to detach from the vehicle after main engine cutoff, descend through the atmosphere with a heat shield and parachute, being captured by a helicopter in mid-air.[16] ULA estimated that reusing the engines in this way would reduce the cost of the first stage propulsion by 90%, where propulsion is 65% of the total first stage cost." Vulcan (rocket) - Wikipedia

The first Vulcan flight is scheduled for April 2021. SpaceX has a lead that's not going to be overcome, imo.
 
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