We need to save the bees

May 2016
6,096
3,348
Anywhereiam, USA
#1
Last edited:
Feb 2014
12,580
7,844
nunya
#4
Its a serious problem. The honey bee gets all the press, but its actually the true native North American bees that are in trouble. Mites seem to be the general consensus, but pesticides are not being ruled out as a contributing factor. (The honey bee is not a true North American native species)
 
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Mar 2019
4
3
New Jersey
#5
Today, bees around the globe are in trouble, some pesticides vary in their effects on bees. Using of modern pesticides is extremely powerful and many are long-lasting and very toxic to bees and other insects. That is why, it is important to use natural pesticides and most of the pest control companies prefer to use organic pesticides and will safely remove the bees from your home and they do not kill them and do not damage honey's bees' ability to fly.
 
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Dec 2016
5,201
2,654
Canada
#6
Today, bees around the globe are in trouble, some pesticides vary in their effects on bees. Using of modern pesticides is extremely powerful and many are long-lasting and very toxic to bees and other insects. That is why, it is important to use natural pesticides and most of the pest control companies prefer to use organic pesticides and will safely remove the bees from your home and they do not kill them and do not damage honey's bees' ability to fly.
Yes, banning neonicotinoids and glyphosates would help, but the other big problem is still monocropping by Big Ag! Bees try to gather pollen from a variety of sources, and that can't be done where there are massive farms of gmo corn, cotton, wheat etc.. And that has been a crisis for the rest of the insect populations as well.
 
Mar 2019
4
3
New Jersey
#7
Yes, I agree with you.
Neonicotinoids and glyphosates are one of the most common pesticides used in agriculture and it is extensively used by home and garden centers. This exposure to these pesticides can kill bees directly. Even, Organophosphates are a class of toxic nerve agent pesticides that threaten human health and the environment.
 
Dec 2016
5,201
2,654
Canada
#8
Yes, I agree with you.
Neonicotinoids and glyphosates are one of the most common pesticides used in agriculture and it is extensively used by home and garden centers. This exposure to these pesticides can kill bees directly. Even, Organophosphates are a class of toxic nerve agent pesticides that threaten human health and the environment.
The gains in productivity made possible by oil-based fertilizers + mined phosphates, gmo seeds and pesticides, may be the most destructive technological advances of the post-WWII era.
Before then, farmers built up the soil by rotating crops...allowing a portion of the fields to lie fallow for grazing, so most farming was sustainable except when there were prolonged droughts, like the 1930's 'Dust Bowl'. Most of the time their farms were sustainable, but now, modern agriculture that billions of people are dependent on for cheap food, is destroying topsoil, running out of mined phosphate supplies and even groundwater for irrigation in many major grain-growing regions. What happens afterward?
 
Oct 2010
67,328
27,219
Colorado
#9
The gains in productivity made possible by oil-based fertilizers + mined phosphates, gmo seeds and pesticides, may be the most destructive technological advances of the post-WWII era.
Before then, farmers built up the soil by rotating crops...allowing a portion of the fields to lie fallow for grazing, so most farming was sustainable except when there were prolonged droughts, like the 1930's 'Dust Bowl'. Most of the time their farms were sustainable, but now, modern agriculture that billions of people are dependent on for cheap food, is destroying topsoil, running out of mined phosphate supplies and even groundwater for irrigation in many major grain-growing regions. What happens afterward?
Until the plant-manure cycle is reestablished, along with cover crops, crop rotation, and mixed planting, agriculture is unsustainable. Period.
 
May 2013
5,417
4,613
arkansas
#10
I plant a bee garden every year and have a couple of Mason bee houses in my back yard. Mason bees are more docile and work much harder than honey bees. All you need to provide them is a box filled with bamboo tubes, some flowering plants and some mud.

Some Mason bee sites recommend harvesting the cocoons and storing them in the fridge for the winter. I've never done this and I haven't had any problems with by new bees hatching.
 
Likes: imaginethat

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