What Would a Socialist America Look Like? We asked thinkers on the left—and a couple of outliers—to describe their vision

What would A socialist USA look like

  • 1) Cuba or Venezuela

    Votes: 2 33.3%
  • 2) Canada or Australia

    Votes: 4 66.7%
  • 3) Nordic Region

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 4) oh hell we all know it will look just like Vermont

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 5) exactly like the army and the us postal service maybe amtrak or the veterans administration

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    6
Dec 2018
635
241
New England
#61
Having Germany is an asset, so is the UK leaving. That are two big positives for the EU project IMHO. The EU might get into big troubles only if the franco-german alliance gets into trouble. That is the reason why the next german chancellor will be Karrenbauer btw. The Germans will try to salvage at least that. I still believe that the EU will keep going, but we will have to wait and see. At any rate the problems are not related to overspending in the nordic countries, which we were discussing, because there is no such thing.

As for the list of the other countries, they are all big fans of staying in the EU. There are some rebels on individual issues like the hungarian Orban on immigration, the poles on some legislative measures, but ask Orban if he wants to leave, the answer will be resounding no. The people want the EU, they are not as stupid as part of the brits, who btw leave because of some former glorious empire pride, the economic interest is what keeps the whole circus going.
To some extend, one can view the EU as an aggregated welfare state, and like any welfare system there are net givers and net takers. It should surprise no one that the net takers in the EU system (Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Spain, and others) enjoy EU membership. That is the nature of being on the dole: dependency.
 
Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#62
Sorry, no. European labor is not competitive with most of the rest of the world. The high cost is but one factor. Then there's the absolute byzantine labor laws that make it nearly impossible to fire someone, even for cause. I stand by my statement; most companies actively avoid creating new jobs there; it's why their unemployment numbers (and especially their labor participation rates) are almost always worse than ours.
you really havent studied the wordl today have you? labour laws have changed to adapt to todays global economy take denmark for example just as easy to hire and fire there as here Flexicurity
 
Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#64
To some extend, one can view the EU as an aggregated welfare state, and like any welfare system there are net givers and net takers. It should surprise no one that the net takers in the EU system (Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Spain, and others) enjoy EU membership. That is the nature of being on the dole: dependency.
widows and orphans bitch like in the bible
 
Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#65
The American economy is the strongest in the world and has been for quite some time, though I don't have the slightest idea what you mean by "mcburger economy;" it's almost as if you have a disdain for entry level jobs.

And France will lower taxes (which is distinctly different from abandoning new ones, BTW) when it begins to shrink the size of its government; good luck to them with that.
no no we are becmng the third world europe is the better place to live in the world.

29 November, 2017
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North AmericaEurope
In 2017, North America fell behind Western Europe to become the second most prosperous region in the world. Prosperity in North America declined faster than in any other region in 2017. This decline was driven by weakening Social Capital, Personal Freedom and Safety and Security.
Despite being a region of only two countries, North America is home to 350 million people. Canada fell three ranks in the Index this year to eighth, and now has its lowest prosperity score since 2007. The US fell by one rank to 18th. North America: Falls in latest rankings :: Legatum Prosperity Index 2018
 
Dec 2018
635
241
New England
#67
no no we are becmng the third world europe is the better place to live in the world.

29 November, 2017
Print
Tags
North AmericaEurope
In 2017, North America fell behind Western Europe to become the second most prosperous region in the world. Prosperity in North America declined faster than in any other region in 2017. This decline was driven by weakening Social Capital, Personal Freedom and Safety and Security.
Despite being a region of only two countries, North America is home to 350 million people. Canada fell three ranks in the Index this year to eighth, and now has its lowest prosperity score since 2007. The US fell by one rank to 18th. North America: Falls in latest rankings :: Legatum Prosperity Index 2018
If you think shoveling over half of what you earn to an ever expansive central government defines "prosperity," then by all means go for it. I prefer a bit more control over my life.
 
Jun 2018
636
208
Toronto
#69
Sorry, no. European labor is not competitive with most of the rest of the world. The high cost is but one factor. Then there's the absolute byzantine labor laws that make it nearly impossible to fire someone, even for cause. I stand by my statement; most companies actively avoid creating new jobs there; it's why their unemployment numbers (and especially their labor participation rates) are almost always worse than ours.

I admit, you have a point there. Indeed the europeans could do something about their taxation and excessive spending and also about their business climate.
Although here are some facts.

EU: unemployment rate 2018 by country | Statista

and

index about ease of doing business:
Ease of doing business index - Wikipedia

they are all in a very good position actually.

Now from the unemployment statistics one thing I seem to see is that the unemplyment is related not to the taxation rate, but with the country's debt and the austerity it brings sooner or later. The US' austerity didn't start yet. You still haven't seen anything yet.

As for some companies avoiding hiring in Europe, good luck to them, if they can't afford to pay european salaries, they shouldn't have a business there indeed..
 
Jun 2012
41,445
15,032
Barsoom
#70
It is pretty easy for a country to play kumbaya socialism when the US spends close to $1 trillion per year so these countries do not end up speaking Russian, Chinese, etc.
 
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