When the French state owned more of the French economy than communist china does now, and why they called it 30 glorious years

Sep 2018
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cleveland ohio
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The French economist Jean Fourastié called them ‘les trente glorieuses’. The Germans and the Italians coined the words Wirtschaft swunder and miracolo economico, respectively. No matter how the thirty-odd years after the end of World War II were characterised by Europe's various cultures, they stand out as the period of the fastest economic growth in the continent's history. In retrospect, the years between the late 1940s and the early 1970s have been seen as a Golden Age, when the foundations of future prosperity were established on firm ground. This article analyses the most relevant features of Europe's extraordinary growth during the ‘glorious thirty’, and tries to explain why, after all, there was nothing ‘miraculous’ about them. In doing so, it takes a broad perspective of Europe as a single region within the world economy, although divided into two areas by an ‘Iron Curtain’. The article also looks at postwar reconstruction, trade and the process of European integration, the international monetary system in Western Europe, and the end and the long-term impact of the Golden Age.
‘Les Trente Glorieuses’: From the Marshall Plan to the Oil Crisis - Oxford Handbooks
https://eserve.org.uk/tmc/contem/trente1.htm
France was soon on its feet with industrial output up to pre-war levels by 1947. This was largely achieved by a number of initiatives. Firstly, there was the active role of the state in industry oversaw the nationalisation of public utilities (e.g. CDF - Charbonnages de France; EDF - Électricité de France; GDF - Gaz de France), airlines (Air France), banks (Banque de France) and many other private companies like the Renault car factory (Régie Nationale des Usines Renault).

France was soon on its feet with industrial output up to pre-war levels by 1947. This was largely achieved by a number of initiatives. Firstly, there was the active role of the state in industry oversaw the nationalisation of public utilities (e.g. CDF - Charbonnages de France; EDF - Électricité de France; GDF - Gaz de France), airlines (Air France), banks (Banque de France) and many other private companies like the Renault car factory (Régie Nationale des Usines Renault).

As a result of these nationalisations, France became the most state-controlled capitalist country in the world. Another factor behind economic recovery was the Marshall Aid Plan an American initiative which gave grants, loans and subsidies to struggling post-war nations. The issue of raising the birth rate was an additional factor in France's industrial recovery: more babies meant more demand for goods and services and more potential worker-consumers. There was a clear link, then, between production and reproduction, conception and consumption. Immigration too played a central role in the economic modernisation and growth that characterises les trente glorieuses.
For those who like their statistics neat, between 1945 and 1975 the economy grew on average by 5% per annum, which was a considerable economic achievement at the time. Both industry and agriculture were undergoing a process of increasing modernisation.

I would call this market socialism, most might refer to it as state capitalism, call if Pierre , a rose by any other name .. it worked .. bitches
 

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