Whew! Bad Time To Be a Bigot in Australia!

Dec 2006
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New Haven, CT
This New Australian Law Could Throw Homophobes Into Prison for 3 Years
In late June, the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW) passed The Crimes Amendment (Publicly Threatening and Inciting Violence) Bill 2018. The Australian homophobia law, which comes into effect today, outlines protections against discrimination based on gender identity, sexuality, religion and race. It also adds protection for bisexual, non-binary and intersex people and carries a stiff penalty for those who discriminate against these groups.
The Crimes Amendment was introduced to the NSW Parliament in the beginning of June and passed only two weeks later on June 21. The new law protects people based on race, religion, sexuality, gender, intersex status and HIV status. The law doesn’t only protect against physical violence either; it also protects against hate speech, be it broadcast, distributed via flyer or just said aloud.
During Australia‘s marriage equality plebiscite last year, there were a number of homophobic posters placed around Melbourne, funded by an American neo-Nazi group. Though Melbourne is in the state of Victoria, similar posters would not be allowed in NSW now that this law has been passed.

Likewise, the recent incident in Missouri where three straight men were beaten because their assaulter assumed they were gay wouldn’t fly under the Australia homophobia law. The Crimes Amendment explicitly states that it doesn’t matter whether or not the “alleged offender’s assumptions or beliefs about an attribute of another person or a member of a group of persons were correct or incorrect.”
The penalties for breaking the laws are strong. If an individual breaks the new laws, they can be punished by a fine of $11,000 AUD (a little over $8,000 USD), three years in prison or both. A corporation that breaks the law will be hit with a $55,000 AUD fine (about $40,000 USD).
New South Wales is the largest state in Australia and home to the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

Geesh - we'd lose half the DtT members if it passed here!
 
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Reactions: GluteusMaximus
Dec 2006
26,829
12,082
New Haven, CT
It's not deep.
If you write or say anything that incites violence against a member of a protected class minority, it's hate speech.
If you advocate the legislation of any law that would marginalize (or minimize the rights) of a protected class minority, it's hate speech.
 
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Reactions: leekohler2
Nov 2012
5,758
3,491
Kekistan
It's not deep.
If you write or say anything that incites violence against a member of a protected class minority, it's hate speech.
If you advocate the legislation of any law that would marginalize (or minimize the rights) of a protected class minority, it's hate speech.
So basically your not allowed to have an opinion that a protected minority class disagrees with.
 
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Reactions: Braveheart
Dec 2013
33,811
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Beware of watermelons
It's not deep.
If you write or say anything that incites violence against a member of a protected class minority, it's hate speech.
If you advocate the legislation of any law that would marginalize (or minimize the rights) of a protected class minority, it's hate speech.

And what constitutes a "protected class"?

And are we also using the common leftists rhetoric that "speech is violence"?
 
Dec 2013
33,811
19,364
Beware of watermelons
So basically your not allowed to have an opinion that a protected minority class disagrees with.

Man, maybe south Africa should adopt this. Could do those minority farmers some good.
 
Nov 2012
5,758
3,491
Kekistan
It's not deep.
If you write or say anything that incites violence against a member of a protected class minority, it's hate speech.
If you advocate the legislation of any law that would marginalize (or minimize the rights) of a protected class minority, it's hate speech.
I someone advocated for ending affirmative action, then in your view, they should be charged and imprisoned. Is that a correct statement?