Who's paying taxes?

Apr 2014
3,170
1,370
redacted
#5
First, I’m paying a shitload of taxes (technical term) for 2018.

Second, that is a dishonest argument. As dishonest as liberals who keep bitching how much the US pays for military spending without taking into account GDP or GNP. Even if we have a flat tax of 20%, a person making a million dollars is going to pay $200,000 in taxes while a person only making $100,000 will pay $20,000 meaning the millionaire is paying 90% of the taxes. Are you saying the person making $100,000 isn’t paying enough @NatMorton ?
 
Apr 2019
175
30
cleveland ohio
#7
First, I’m paying a shitload of taxes (technical term) for 2018.

Second, that is a dishonest argument. As dishonest as liberals who keep bitching how much the US pays for military spending without taking into account GDP or GNP. Even if we have a flat tax of 20%, a person making a million dollars is going to pay $200,000 in taxes while a person only making $100,000 will pay $20,000 meaning the millionaire is paying 90% of the taxes. Are you saying the person making $100,000 isn’t paying enough @NatMorton ?
How the U.S. Compares
The United States comes in at 25.6% in this category of average-earning singles with no children, giving it the 16th highest tax rate. The countries with the lowest all-in average personal income tax rates on single people with no children are Chile (7.0%), Mexico (10.3%) and Korea (13.8%).
1. Belgium, 42.0%
Belgium, like many countries we’ll discuss here, has a progressive tax, which means that higher-income individuals pay more taxes than lower-income individuals do. Its top progressive rate is 50%. Income from property, work, investments and miscellaneous sources is all taxable. Capital gains tax rates depend on the type of capital. Employees also pay a social security tax of 13.07% of their income. The government allows deductions for business expenses, social contributions and 80% of alimony payments, and there is a personal allowance based on filing status.

2. Germany, 39.7%
Germany levies a progressive income and capital tax that caps out at 45%. Sources of taxable income include agriculture, forestry, business ownership, employment, self-employment, savings and investments, rental property and capital gains. The first EUR 801 in savings and investment income is not taxed, thanks to the saver’s allowance. There is a 25% withholding tax on interest and dividends and a 15% withholding tax on royalties.

Members of certain churches pay an 8% or 9% church tax, which is tax deductible. Church taxes are levied in many European countries. In some cases only church members are required to pay a percentage of income to the church to which they belong; in others all taxpayers pay a church tax, but have the option of paying it to the state instead of to a religious organization.

Income of up to EUR 8,652 is considered a personal allowance and is not taxed. Other deductions include a percentage of contributions to a statutory pension insurance plan; health insurance premiums; private accident, life, unemployment and disability insurance premiums; donations to registered charities; and up to EUR 6,000 per year in training for a future profession.

3. Denmark, 36.1%
Denmark’s progressive income tax tops out at 55.8%, and the average individual pays 45%. The Danes pay an 8% Danish labor market contribution tax, a 5% healthcare tax, 22.5% to 27.8% in municipal taxes, social security taxes of DKK1,080 (USD 164) per year and capital gains taxes of 27% or 42%. There is a withholding tax of 27% on dividends and 25% on royalties.

Employment income, bonuses, fringe benefits, business income, fees, pensions, annuities, social security benefits, dividends, interest, capital gains and real estate rental income are all taxable. There is also a voluntary church tax of 0.43% to 1.40%.

Tax deductions are available for limited contributions to approved Danish pensions, unemployment insurance, interest on debt, charitable contributions, unreimbursed work travel and double households.

4. Austria, 34.9%
Austrians pay progressive taxes as high as 55% on earned income, which includes employment income and certain fringe benefits. Investment income and capital gains are taxed at 27.5%. White-collar employees contribute 18.07% of their income to social security, while blue-collar employees contribute 18.2%, subject to a ceiling of EUR 4,530.

Austria provides automatic tax credits based on the number of individuals in a household that earn income, as well as credits for children and travel to work. Certain work-related expenses and child-care expenses are tax deductible.

5. Hungary, 34.5%
Unlike other countries discussed in this article, Hungary assesses a flat personal income tax, not a progressive one, and the rate is 16%. This rate sounds relatively low, but as it applies to all income, it does not necessarily mean that Hungarians have a lower overall tax burden. Passive income from sources such as dividends, interest and property rentals is also taxed at 16%. Hungary provides deductions for professional training and business travel expenses, and families receive a deduction for each child. Hungary treats each spouse as a separate taxpayer. Social insurance contributions are 18.5% of income for employees.

How the U.S. Compares
The United States comes in at 25.6% in this category of average-earning singles with no children, giving it the 16th highest tax rate. The countries with the lowest all-in average personal income tax rates on single people with no children are Chile (7.0%), Mexico (10.3%) and Korea (13.8%).

The 5 Countries with the Highest Income Taxes for Average-Earning Married Couples With Two Children and One Working Spouse
I will add my own words americans complain about taxes but compared to other nations? the amount they pay is actually low
 
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Apr 2014
3,170
1,370
redacted
#8
How the U.S. Compares
The United States comes in at 25.6% in this category of average-earning singles with no children, giving it the 16th highest tax rate. The countries with the lowest all-in average personal income tax rates on single people with no children are Chile (7.0%), Mexico (10.3%) and Korea (13.8%).
1. Belgium, 42.0%
Belgium, like many countries we’ll discuss here, has a progressive tax, which means that higher-income individuals pay more taxes than lower-income individuals do. Its top progressive rate is 50%. Income from property, work, investments and miscellaneous sources is all taxable. Capital gains tax rates depend on the type of capital. Employees also pay a social security tax of 13.07% of their income. The government allows deductions for business expenses, social contributions and 80% of alimony payments, and there is a personal allowance based on filing status.

2. Germany, 39.7%
Germany levies a progressive income and capital tax that caps out at 45%. Sources of taxable income include agriculture, forestry, business ownership, employment, self-employment, savings and investments, rental property and capital gains. The first EUR 801 in savings and investment income is not taxed, thanks to the saver’s allowance. There is a 25% withholding tax on interest and dividends and a 15% withholding tax on royalties.

Members of certain churches pay an 8% or 9% church tax, which is tax deductible. Church taxes are levied in many European countries. In some cases only church members are required to pay a percentage of income to the church to which they belong; in others all taxpayers pay a church tax, but have the option of paying it to the state instead of to a religious organization.

Income of up to EUR 8,652 is considered a personal allowance and is not taxed. Other deductions include a percentage of contributions to a statutory pension insurance plan; health insurance premiums; private accident, life, unemployment and disability insurance premiums; donations to registered charities; and up to EUR 6,000 per year in training for a future profession.

3. Denmark, 36.1%
Denmark’s progressive income tax tops out at 55.8%, and the average individual pays 45%. The Danes pay an 8% Danish labor market contribution tax, a 5% healthcare tax, 22.5% to 27.8% in municipal taxes, social security taxes of DKK1,080 (USD 164) per year and capital gains taxes of 27% or 42%. There is a withholding tax of 27% on dividends and 25% on royalties.

Employment income, bonuses, fringe benefits, business income, fees, pensions, annuities, social security benefits, dividends, interest, capital gains and real estate rental income are all taxable. There is also a voluntary church tax of 0.43% to 1.40%.

Tax deductions are available for limited contributions to approved Danish pensions, unemployment insurance, interest on debt, charitable contributions, unreimbursed work travel and double households.

4. Austria, 34.9%
Austrians pay progressive taxes as high as 55% on earned income, which includes employment income and certain fringe benefits. Investment income and capital gains are taxed at 27.5%. White-collar employees contribute 18.07% of their income to social security, while blue-collar employees contribute 18.2%, subject to a ceiling of EUR 4,530.

Austria provides automatic tax credits based on the number of individuals in a household that earn income, as well as credits for children and travel to work. Certain work-related expenses and child-care expenses are tax deductible.

5. Hungary, 34.5%
Unlike other countries discussed in this article, Hungary assesses a flat personal income tax, not a progressive one, and the rate is 16%. This rate sounds relatively low, but as it applies to all income, it does not necessarily mean that Hungarians have a lower overall tax burden. Passive income from sources such as dividends, interest and property rentals is also taxed at 16%. Hungary provides deductions for professional training and business travel expenses, and families receive a deduction for each child. Hungary treats each spouse as a separate taxpayer. Social insurance contributions are 18.5% of income for employees.

How the U.S. Compares
The United States comes in at 25.6% in this category of average-earning singles with no children, giving it the 16th highest tax rate. The countries with the lowest all-in average personal income tax rates on single people with no children are Chile (7.0%), Mexico (10.3%) and Korea (13.8%).

The 5 Countries with the Highest Income Taxes for Average-Earning Married Couples With Two Children and One Working Spouse
I will add my own words americans complain about taxes but compared to other nations? the amount they pay is actually low
Thanks, but I already knew Europe was more fucked up than a football bat and a soup sandwich. No need for the US to do the same. :)
 

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