Would you eat these GM eggs under a doctor's recommendation

May 2018
2,863
2,018
USA
#31
DAMMIT. Transgenic species have never occurred in nature, nor before humans perfected methods of gene splicing.

The claim that all foods are GMO is an example of fake news.
Well obviously we never "gene spliced" plants until that tech was developed. However GMO stands for "Genetically Modified Organism"). Genetic modification also utilizes selective breeding, which is what most people either choose to forget or don't know about. Regarding transgenic species, there are multiple examples of plant hybridization, and plants far more readily hybridize than animals do, per Wikipedia. Since the plants share the genes from 2 different species, technically they are "transgenic".

Hybrid (biology) - Wikipedia
 
Apr 2013
36,190
24,614
Left coast
#32
An uncle of mine (from the University of Manitoba of all places) got on the nobel prize shortlist for his work on splicing a branch from one type of fruit tree on a different fruit tree.

He got some neat things, but non of them were fertile.

Where does that fall in the GM spectrum?
 
Oct 2010
66,161
26,531
Colorado
#33
Well obviously we never "gene spliced" plants until that tech was developed. However GMO stands for "Genetically Modified Organism"). Genetic modification also utilizes selective breeding, which is what most people either choose to forget or don't know about. Regarding transgenic species, there are multiple examples of plant hybridization, and plants far more readily hybridize than animals do, per Wikipedia. Since the plants share the genes from 2 different species, technically they are "transgenic".

Hybrid (biology) - Wikipedia
Incorrect.

Transgenic -- Relating to or denoting an organism that contains genetic material into which DNA from an unrelated organism has been artificially introduced. transgenic | Definition of transgenic in English by Oxford Dictionaries

Bt corn and Roundup Ready soybeans would have never occurred in nature, by humans practicing selective breeding, or even by humans crossing varieties or species. Transgenic organisms require using the technology of gene splicing/editing.
 
May 2018
2,863
2,018
USA
#34
An uncle of mine (from the University of Manitoba of all places) got on the nobel prize shortlist for his work on splicing a branch from one type of fruit tree on a different fruit tree.

He got some neat things, but non of them were fertile.

Where does that fall in the GM spectrum?
Unnaturally induced hybridization, I'm guessing? It's pretty cool though. I saw an apple tree growing peaches on a couple branches :D
 
Oct 2010
66,161
26,531
Colorado
#35
An uncle of mine (from the University of Manitoba of all places) got on the nobel prize shortlist for his work on splicing a branch from one type of fruit tree on a different fruit tree.

He got some neat things, but non of them were fertile.

Where does that fall in the GM spectrum?
Grafting trees has quite a history. Many hybrid pecan varieties are grafted onto the sturdier native pecan rootstock.

I have a friend who grafted a freestone peach variety onto an almond rootstock. The flavor is unlike anything I've ever tasted!!
 
Jun 2018
771
248
Toronto
#36
Incorrect.

Transgenic -- Relating to or denoting an organism that contains genetic material into which DNA from an unrelated organism has been artificially introduced. transgenic | Definition of transgenic in English by Oxford Dictionaries

Bt corn and Roundup Ready soybeans would have never occurred in nature, by humans practicing selective breeding, or even by humans crossing varieties or species. Transgenic organisms require using the technology of gene splicing/editing.
How do you think different species emerged in the first place? Through many random mutations and natural selection. The gene editing technology is just doing it deliberately.
 
Oct 2010
66,161
26,531
Colorado
#38
Wiki:

Because grafting involves the joining of vascular tissues between the scion and rootstock, plants lacking vascular cambium, such as monocots, cannot normally be grafted. As a general rule, the closer two plants are genetically, the more likely the graft union will form. Genetically identical clones and intra-species plants have a high success rate for grafting. Grafting between species of the same genus is sometimes successful. Grafting has a low success rate when performed with plants in the same family but in different genera. And grafting between different families is rare.

Grafting - Wikipedia
 
Sep 2015
13,781
5,002
Brown Township, Ohio
#40
Yes, I’d eat the eggs. I have no problem with GM foods. A bigger problem is the pesticides, herbicides and other chemicals showing up in our food. GM helps eliminate the need for those chemicals.
Not only no but Hell no. Would you eat the shrimp from Shit River? Terrible tasting but I ate it.
 

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